from a dead looking stick

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http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/t/h/theplanter/Confederate-Rose.html
about 3 years ago a friend gave us a dead looking stick and told us if we planted the stick in the ground and watered it once a day for two weeks we'd get a Confederate Rose bush.
I decided to play along thinking there would be some great future laughs concerning how I was tricked into planting a dead looking stick.
http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/t/h/theplanter/Confederate-Rose.html
well, the friend was not playing a joke. now I get to enjoy taking cuttings from this bush and telling other friends how if you plant this dead looking stick in the ground you'll get a Confederate Rose bush.
been kind of neat watching this bush being propagated into the yards of friends.
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On 10/29/07 1:09 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net, "Jim"

That is neat. I did a quick google and it isn't nearly hardy enough. Would it make a house plant?
C
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Cheryl Isaak wrote:

yea, Confederates don't do well up north, just look what happened to them at Gettysburg.
<g>

I don't know the answer to that.
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On 10/29/07 9:46 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net, "Jim"

Snicker! I wasn't even going to go there. I plenty of New Englanders that have headed south, but the few southerners that came north couldn't handle the weather.
C
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Cheryl Isaak wrote:

[....]
in a different life when I was traveling for Nortel I made many trips to Canada in January and February. it was during those trips I discovered how we in NC should not use the word 'cold' as a descriptor for describing the weather conditions here in NC. it simply does not get cold in NC.
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[snip]
Two winters at Fort Churchill made getting back to southern Ontario seem springlike -- but I don't think roses would have grown in the winter --
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JimR wrote:

[snip]
Ottawa was the usual destination because the BNR labs for the products I was associated with were located there. I tried to get a summer time trip but never managed it. Buffalo NY was another place where the word 'cold' was applicable.
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Hah! Takes me back...
I remember tenting at minus 25 (at which point, ISTR, Celsius and Fahrenheit converge?), during a 10-day mushing trip on the Great Slave Lake. Ah...them were the days..
Persephone

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On 10/29/07 8:16 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, "JimR"

As I write, it is 6:36 AM and it 28 degrees. And still dark.
Cheryl Southern NH
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At 6:36 AM here it also was still dark and also was 28 degrees, except my 28 degrees were C.
JimR Florida Highlands
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On 10/30/07 9:38 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, "JimR"
Snip

Blowing raspberries in your direction! I needed the fleece coat this AM.
C
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its noon here and its 66 degrees! milwaukee, wisconsin (on lake michigan)
wrote:

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readandpostrosie wrote:

Hah! I beat you! Its 68 here on the northwest side of Milwaukee. :)
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Cheryl Isaak wrote:

[....]
34F was the morning low here. we got our first frost this morning YeeHaw!!!
Jim central NC
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on 10/30/2007 6:37 AM Cheryl Isaak said the following:

6:15 PM 55 F. The low today was 38 F
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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Jim wrote:

That "rose" has palmate leaves which I have never seen on a rose before. Usually they are compound. The blooms and buds sure look like roses.
Does anyone know its botanical name or another common name for it? I doubt it would be cold hardy in my zone. I would like to see if there is anything like it on helpmefind.com.
The only other rose I saw with very unusual leaves was what some thought might be an alba; instead of the usual five of 7 leaflets on one stem, it had several more pairs than that.
I have just learned that roses may root from "sticks" if you put them in the ground when they are dormant. So when you say "stick", I assume that there are no leaves and that it was dormant when you put it in the ground. It must root easily; sometimes it helps to use rooting powder, but I guess them thar Confederate roses root like Forsythia.
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Hettie wrote:

[....]
http://www.ask.com/web?q=Growing+Confederate+Rose&qsrc=6&o=0&l=dir
the above URL points to the search results provided by ask.com
I hope you find the information useful and informative.
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Jim wrote:

Two links took me to Dave's Garden and several other interesting articles which were indeed informative. Lovely thing. Hibiscus mutabilis.
Each person in their own way contributed to solving that mystery, and Confederate Rose was not incorrect either. Alas, only grows in zones 7 to 11, wouldn't want to try it as an annual although if seeds started early enough, would bloom the first year.
If and when I have the time, may try to grow one as a potted plant and bring it in for the winter. It is a pretty thing.
Thanks for all the good comments and links.
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Hard to remember. Sorry about that.
Thanks again for the responses.
TOTB wrote:
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TOTB wrote:

you are most welcome.
now onto resolving the next mystery.
http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/t/h/theplanter/wildrose.html
I call these wild roses. they were growing along side the highway and every year just as they were about to bloom the hwy maintenance people who were watching via their secret satellite would send a crew out to mow them down. I got tired of that so I dug some of them up and moved them to several different locations here on the Farm. there are white ones, pink ones and red ones. the URL exhibits a pink one utilizing the chain link of the dog pen as a means to climb.
I call them wild roses but have no idea what they'd be called by one who is schooled properly in the science of horticulture.
Jim in central NC
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