Dead spots in lawn

I had a new lawn and sprinkler system professionally installed in 1999. Every year since 2002 there have been numerous dead spots everywhere. It looks like it will be the same this year. I have always had a professional landscaper take care of the fertilizer/weed killer/grub control applications. (I usually apply starter fert. between his applications-this was a tip from the lawn installation company). He has been unable to explain why my grass dies.
The water from my point well has a lot of iron in it. The grass is Kentucky Blue grass and was originally hydroseeded. My neighbor next door does not have my lawns problem. His lawn/sprinklers were professionally installed in '99 too, by a different company. His grass was from seed and his water is city water; no iron.
Pictures can be seen at: http://www.outsourceparts.com/crappylawn (click on the thumbnails for larger view)
-Is the iron a problem?
-Am I stressing the grass with the starter fertilizer?
-Good loam was added over my original lawn- I assume that is deep enough.
-I mow at 2.75" (1" lower for the last mowing)
What do you think the problem is?
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where do u live How much water is it getting per week whats it like when u walk on it is it spongy the pic are good but a nice pic of the blade and root might help
Icarii

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I live in Massachusetts. With the sprinkler system I probably water too much rather than too little- I did back off on the watering last year. I never noticed a spongy feeling other than becuse the grass is fairly deep. I will look at getting a root and blade picture.
Thanks, Jeff
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So im thinking snow mold, Rake away the matted tissue and overseed any thin areas after the grass begins to grow Light fertilizer is ok I would like to see it after its been growing for while maybe after its been cut a few times Also check yor thatch level 1\2 inch is okay
wish i could be more help Icarii
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Jeffrey K. Judd wrote:

Are you getting salt spray from winter traffic on a nearby street?
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issue. I do have a suspicion that the dead spots have something to do with the snow. Is there a fungus or mold (other than snow mold) that could kill grass?
Thanks, Jeff
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Jeffrey K. Judd wrote:

I'd let the landscaper do *all* of the fertilizing or fertilize the lawn the same way as the neighbor who doesn't have the problem.
I'm not a lawn care pro.
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does your neighbor take care of snow sooner? does he get rid of snow more then you ?
"Jeffrey K. Judd" wrote:

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feet lower in elevation and I think the cold air settles in my yard causing the snow to last a little longer.
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Is it possible that some areas of the yard are being missed by the sprinkler? I had a couple of spots that just were not getting as much water as the rest of the yard due to the way the sprinkler patterns overlapped (or rather didn't overlap). When we'd hit a dry patch these spots would dry out and the yard would go brown in these areas. Here's a test. Get two equal containers about 3 ~ 4 inches deep (something like a tupperware container will do nicely). Put one container in the middle of one of your chronic dead spots. Put the other where the grass does well. Run your sprinkler system through a cycle. Does the container from the dead spot have a lot less water? If so you need to have the heads adjusted.
Jeffrey K. Judd wrote:

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sprinklers installed in '99. Pure laziness has prevented it from getting done. I think, if anything, I am over watering. I don't think my coverage is a problem; everything seems to get hit pretty well.
I am pretty sure that my problem is snow mold and I am the cause by applying starter fertilizer between my Lawn care companies applications. I read that too much nitrogen could weaken the grasses resistance to snow mold. I will stop doing that, at least near the end of the season.
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It's fusarium patch.... or otherwise known as snow mold. You lawn will recover, but may suffer again in the mid summer. My suggestion would be to turn off your sprinkler this year. Don't fertilize in the summer and cut it quite short for the last cut of the year.
Peter H
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