Cub Cadet Zero Turn chewing up lawn.

My Cub Cadet Z-force really chews up the lawn at the turn/pivot points when the grass is the least bit damp. Since my yard is over clay, it is almost always damp. Will a different tire tread help reduce this? Or is the only solution coming to a complete stop at each turn? Thanks. Doug B.
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Doug B. Wrote:

Have you tried slowing down while turning and reversing one tire
-- restrorob
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On Sat, 13 Jan 2007 21:24:48 +0000, restrorob

Yes. What I was specifically wondering about was increasing the wheel/tire size. I've noticed the commercial versions of these zero-turns have bigger wheels all around.
I really think the rear slip is mostly caused by the small size of the front caster wheels. The mower won't turn until the front wheels are in the position that allows them to roll, versus drag. It takes just a second for the front wheel to spin, but is enough for the rear tire to lose traction.
Never had this problem on my old garden tractor. Doug B.
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Doug B. said:

Is it actually pulling the turf out, or just digging in as it turns?
--

Eggs

-I'd rather have a free bottle in front of me than a pre-frontal lobotomy.
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On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 09:12:41 -0600, Eggs Zachtly

The rear wheels spin during the turn. This leaves a muddy patch, so it would seem it is doing both. Sometimes it just grinds the grass into the mud. Doug B.
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Doug B. said:

I don't have a ZTR tractor, so I surely won't have a definitive answer for you, sorry. My question was more of a wondering if there wasn't an insect problem in your turf. One sure sign I've ever seen with grubs, was how easy it was to pull turf out by hand (because of the decimated roots).
If the tire's spinning, it seems to me a poor design. As was suggested, is it possible to reverse the inside tire, during the turn?
--

Eggs

Do Lipton employees take coffee breaks?
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On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 08:18:36 -0600, Eggs Zachtly

That is what how 90% of the turns are accomplished. It doesn't stop either tire from slipping though.
I was hoping some professional lawn contractors might have some tips. Doug B.
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I have the same conditions and problem with my JD SST zero turn. I don't know about availability of wider tires but I'm sure it would help as it is a selling point on more expensive tractors. The solutions I have found that help are 1) adjusting air pressure in tires to achieve maximum traction. 2) Slowing down (stopping if nec) while making the turn. 3) Getting the maximum amount of weight over the rear tire that is reversing ie shifting your body weight or adding weight to the rear of the tractor. 4) Varying where you turn each time you cut so as not to wear out a particular spot. I cut a different direction each time I cut- left to right, front to back, and diagonally front right to left back, and front left to right back. This way I'm turning at different locations each time I cut and am not wearing out the same spots. These methods have seemed to help the problem.
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