Clover

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"The difference is that with products you use at home, you have a CHOICE about using them, and how they're used. With agricultural chemicals, you have NO choice. The decision is made for you, not only as to their presence, but also whether the ones used are safe. Get it? "
Nice non-response. Must I smash this nonsense too? You are one of those guys that thinks he's one of the smart elite and everyone else is too dumb to read a label or make a choice. You think the rest of us need someone else to figure this out and make the choices for us. Some folks really concerned about making the best choice for us, like farmers and the DOA, who are more concerned with shipping cows, than seriously looking for mad cow. Only a couple years ago farmers were selling downer cattle that couldn't even stand up for human food. Even now, in the US, 1 in 90 cattle are tested for mad cow, while in Japan it's 100% and in Europe, it's 1 in 4. Or the folks that pump cattle full of hormones to fatten their profits. But THEY must know what's good for the rest of us when it comes to using a chemical, right? And they make those choices without regard to what's most cost effective or easiest for them right? LOL!
The funniest part about this is all one has to do is take a look at the BS you posted about clover presence in a lawn being a problem with PH or nutrients to see how knowledgable and well informed you really are about things that you profess to know. That must be why you keep asking people how old they are, so you can find a suitable 10 year old to believe your rantings.
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Sorry I disturbed your sleep.
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Aw, c'mon. Does proving one's point have to include snipping at each other? I'm the first to admit that I enjoy wisecracks, sarcasm and snappy reparte among close friends, but it doesn't work here.
Suzy O, self-appointed resident proxy mom
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Shhhh, Suzy. Let him sleep.
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Lysol is a neurotoxin. Most neurologists recommend against using it, especially around anyone who might be vulnerable (the elderly, disabled, children, people with compromised immune systems, other illnesses, etc). When you inhale the particles, it goes directly into your system. One doesn't need to ingest such products to be harmed by them. It's fairly well understood in the medical community that the increase in toxins, pollutants, chemical products, etc over the years has had a summative and cumulative effect on the general health of the population.
Jo
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wrote:

Say what?
Suzy O
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been tested, including on humans: http://extoxnet.orst.edu/pips/24-D.htm . This, by the way, is usually where I get my pesticide info.
Suzy O
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Suzy, did you actually read the page?
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your head either way.
The Kernels Chicken has been rumored to give lab rats cancer, everytime they give them three times their body weight of dark meat too.
What's a mother to do?
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On Thu, 09 Jun 2005 18:32:41 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Check your PH value. It is likely acid based which lime will correct and also minimize the clover.
Thunder

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wrote:

And, if that's the answer, he won't see fast results. It'll take a season, at least.
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"Slow down with the weird remedies. I've read in multiple agricultural sources that clover indicates either a nutrient imbalance or a problem with pH. Both are easy to deal with, without using any sort of chemical nonsense (other than lime and/or the right lawn food). Where are you located? And, what's so bad about clover? "
Another fine example that demostrates Doug's ignorance about lawn care. He thinks any lawn problem can be easily solved without using chemicals. In fact, clover grows quite nicely in exactly the same soil nutrient conditions and PH ranges that lawn grasses do. You can fiddle with nutrients and PH till the cows come home and the clover will still be there.
Clover is actually beneficial to the lawn, as clover puts nitrogen into the soil. However if you don't like the look, you can fix it quite simply with an application of any of the broadleaf weed killers. It should not be done in very hot weather though.
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Just be sure to keep the kids off the lawn for a couple of months.
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above 82-88 degrees, or if it's gonna rain within 12-24 hours.
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Mike wrote:

Bonide Broadleaf weed killer
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