Clover

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Hello,
Anyone know how to get rid of lots of clover from a lawn?
Also, has anyone used these books that have these home remedies for great lawns? I've heard of using soap, etc.
Thanks. Mike
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Mike wrote:

Sheep.
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Slow down with the weird remedies. I've read in multiple agricultural sources that clover indicates either a nutrient imbalance or a problem with pH. Both are easy to deal with, without using any sort of chemical nonsense (other than lime and/or the right lawn food). Where are you located? And, what's so bad about clover?

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We are in north NJ. The front lawn is zoysia grass and clover just doesn't fit in with the look we would like. I have limed and fertilized it but still got the clover all over. :) How do you figure out the nutrient/pH imbalance and what do to?

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First, I'd find your cooperative extension on the web. I spotted it once. It's part of Rutgers, if I recall, and I seem to remember that they provide soil analysis services for homeowners. Then, speak to someone about how to adjust in order to deal with clover. It's been years since a had a printed article about it, so I can't help you with more details. But, it's definitely do-able. In any case, you have to do a soil analysis before you keep throwing random nutrients at it.

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It's neither a nutrient nor a pH imbalance. Somehow clover got in with your lawn grasses -- sometimes people plant it cuz they want it there. Apparently you don't. Use a broadleaf herbicide when the weather is on the cool side (50's or 60's) for it to be most effective.
Suzy, zone 5, Milwaukee

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And be sure to keep kids off the lawn for a couple of months.

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Suzy, since these things cannot be properly tested for safety, I'd be interested in knowing who all your sources were. Seriously. I'm genuinely interested.

I don't have an alternative. I was just telling you to be careful about using your lawn for a period of time. Admittedly, the period of time I suggested was a random choice, but absent any testing method you can trust, hey....sometimes you have to guess.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

Type "2,4-D" to Google. The first thing it found was http://www.24d.org /
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Good site. But, the only way to reliably determine whether ANY substance is harmful to health is to feed it to the population in question, within the limits of a controlled study, as is done with new medicines. So, these products cannot be tested. Sorry.
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"Good site. But, the only way to reliably determine whether ANY substance is harmful to health is to feed it to the population in question, within the limits of a controlled study, as is done with new medicines. "
Yes, I'm sure a lot of people have been used in controlled studies and fed things like the plastics that are used for food containers, aluminum foil, carpet cleaner, lysol, room deodorizer, fantasik spray cleaner, soaps used for washing dishes..... Get the idea?
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None of the products you just mentioned are designed to kill things.
Meanwhile: Here's the source of the toxicology data for the chemicals at that web site. Do I need to explain the significance of this information, or can you extrapolate on your own?
INDUSTRY TASK FORCE II ON 2,4-D RESEARCH DATA B-26 Cedar Point Villas Swansboro, NC 28584 Information Line: U.S. and Canada (800) 345-5109 FAX (252) 393-6327
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Yes, I'm sure a lot of people have been used in controlled studies and

"None of the products you just mentioned are designed to kill things. "
Last time I checked, Lysol contains chemicals specifically designed to kill germs on contact. So do many of the new soaps used for cleaning dishes. Any of those been put through tests where humans eat them? Doooh, there goes that argument! And since when does not being specifically designed to kill things mean that something is automatically safe? I don't think gasoline was designed to kill things either, but I wouldn't drink it.
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OK - Lysol. If you use that in a place where your kids are likely to be rolling around and making constant skin contact, like a lawn, you are an idiot and your kids should be taken away from you and placed in a home with parents who didn't take the short bus to school.
Now - onward: Meanwhile: Here's the source of the toxicology data for the chemicals at that web site. Do I need to explain the significance of this information, or can you extrapolate on your own?
INDUSTRY TASK FORCE II ON 2,4-D RESEARCH DATA B-26 Cedar Point Villas Swansboro, NC 28584 Information Line: U.S. and Canada (800) 345-5109 FAX (252) 393-6327
What does this information mean to you? And while we're at it, how old are you? Your age is crucial to this discussion.
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"OK - Lysol. If you use that in a place where your kids are likely to be rolling around and making constant skin contact, like a lawn, you are an idiot and your kids should be taken away from you and placed in a home with parents who didn't take the short bus to school. "
So it's ok to spray lysol around inside the house, in confined places like the bathroom, or in musty clothes closets, where its' typically used, but not ok to use on the lawn. Glad you cleared that up for us. At least now you recogize that there are a lot of products used in and around the home that haven't been tested by feeding them to humans, as you require to prove safety.
Regarding the short bus comment, most civilized people find remarks like that directed at handicapped people offensive, but coming from you, it's no surprise.
"And while we're at it, how old are you? Your age is crucial to this discussion. "
Old enough to know a bigoted moron when I see one.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Just bigoted? Kanter's an extra special moron. Of the asswipe variety.
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Fall in love with your yard chemicals if you like. Just be aware that out of each container, the only part that's tested in ANY way (probably with lab rats) is the small amount called "active ingredient". The rest is exempt, even though it consists of items already KNOWN to be dangerous to humans. That's why it's exempt.
I'm sorry to keep attacking your family business this way, but you're obviously too young to have been exposed to 35-40 years worth of information on this subject. Your ignorance is appalling.
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"I'm sorry to keep attacking your family business this way, but you're obviously too young to have been exposed to 35-40 years worth of information on this subject. Your ignorance is appalling. "
No need to apologize to me Doug. I'm not in the lawn care business. But perhaps you should appologize to the handicapped for insulting them in this thread a couple posts back. Or to pet owners for advocating poisoning neighbors pets who wander into your yard. As for me being ignorant, perhaps you should go read some of your own posts, like this gem from the beginning of this thread:
"Slow down with the weird remedies. I've read in multiple agricultural sources that clover indicates either a nutrient imbalance or a problem with pH. Both are easy to deal with, without using any sort of chemical nonsense (other than lime and/or the right lawn food). "
Yeah, right, clover indicates a nutrient or PH imbalance. And this coming from the jerk who claims he's the expert on organic lawn care. Most anyone that has anything to do with lawns knows that clover co-exists quite happily in lawns with the exact same PH and nutrients as grass. Even kids who play in the park know it exists in lots of lawns together with grass. Plus, if you knew anything about organic lawn care, you'd know that people actually use clover in organic lawns, as it fixes nitrogen into the soil, as an alternative to fertilizer. So, you can fiddle with PH and nutrients till the cows come home and the clover will still be there. Got it? Class dismissed!
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The difference is that with products you use at home, you have a CHOICE about using them, and how they're used. With agricultural chemicals, you have NO choice. The decision is made for you, not only as to their presence, but also whether the ones used are safe. Get it?
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