2-Stroke oil for ALL 2-strokes? (Trimmer)

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My local shop is now selling single-mix 2-stroke oil. No more 50:1 or 32:1, etc. Mix it with the right amount of fuel and it can go in any 2-stroke engine. These are brand names such as Pulan. Is this a good idea?
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<dan> wrote in message

I always mix heavy on the oil and it hasn't hurt my stuff. But on the other hand I buy cheap and replace at the first sign of trouble.
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On 05 Mar 2008 21:08:23 GMT, "dan" <> wrote:

It's always been the same oil. A container marked 50:1 contains the same oil as one marked 32:1, 16:1 ect.
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dan wrote:

Yes, it's a good idea. Generally the lower the oil ratio the lower the quality. Oil sold as 16:1, when mixed as directed, will provide the same lubrication as an oil sold as 50:1 when mixed as directed. In other words mix according to the instructions on the oil not what the equip mfg says. A one-mix is much simpler to deal with if you have multiple brands of equipment. Ask what your local shop is using. I'm sure it is one of the single mix.
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Art

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If that was true then the 50:1 container would have a different oil than that of the 16:1 container. That is not the case. A container of Brand X 16:1 is the same exact oil as a can of 50:1 Brand X.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

I buy those small singles that are for 1 gallon of gas. I have an old chain saw that said use 16:1, a blower that said use 32:1 & a trimmer that says use 50:1. I've been using the pre-measured 32:1 mix in all of them for about 5 years with only one adverse result. The trimmer tends to smoke slightly!! The chain saw runs a lot better with the 32:1 mix. The chain saw is over 30 years old with never as much as a tune-up, only a new plug every 4 or 5 years. BTW, the blower is the one that gets for more use than the other two combined.
Tom J
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The engine manufacturers recommendation is what you should go by. They are the ones that determine what ratio to use.
Many years ago 2 stroke engines were crude and concerns for pollution were not as great as today. As concerns for pollution became greater engines became more advanced and higher ratios became feasible. I believe that there are no more engines with ratios below 50:1
2 strokes may even be eliminated if not already. Not sure on this.
Previously the ratio stated on cans of 2 stroke oil were only included so that individuals that couldn't deal with figuring out mixes might have an easier time if it was spelled out for them. If one read their engine manual often it would say to ignore the mixing recommendation on the can of oil and just to be sure to mix the oil at the proper ratio that they, the engine manufacturer recommends.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

If you use their oil then yes you should follow their recommendation. If you use a different brand of oil then you should follow the mixing directions on the oil.

Actually the additives in the oil improved and were able to provide the same level of lubrication at leaner mixes and higher temperatures.

That statement is just not believable.
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I don't think so..............

This could be?

For someone that believes that you should follow the mixing directions on the oil can and not the engine then yes, I can believe that you believe the statement is not believable.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Read post 2 here http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t 3749
Now read post 7 here http://lawncafe.com/t8247-2-cycle-oil.html
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wrote:

Can you read. The above links agree with me, not you.
The different ratios that were commonly used on containers of oil became a marketing gimmick that was not apparent to the ignorant.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Both of those posts talk about the quality of the oil or the additive allowing for leaner mixes and providing the same lubrication.
That means you mix according to the oil directions and not the mfg recommendation.
Take for example Stihl - about 10 years ago they sold 32:1 oil and recommended it for use in all their equipment. Then they changed oil to a 50:1 mix and began recommending it be mixed at 50:1, also good for all their old equipment. Now tell me, what changed? The oil did, not the equipment.
If you use oil marked as 32:1 and mix it at 50:1 for use in a Stihl you will toast it. Because the oil does not provide enough lubrication at that mix. If you mix that same 32:1 oil at 32:1 and run it in the Stihl it will be fine.
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I read the entire pages not just the posts you suggested. Here is one quote from the site
As you've seen, there are 16:1, 25:1, 32:1, 40:1 42:1, 50:1, etc. However, if you analyzed these oils, you'd find very similar amounts of the actual ingredients needed to provide the life allowing lubricity, even at these odd ratios. This has been a very effective way of convincing a customer who bought a unit requiring two cycle oil to buy their brand of oil.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

That is the exact post I suggested. Allow me to quote from the first paragraph. "a Tanaka product, and another high quality product, let's say a Shindaiwa chainsaw for the sake of comparison. Both of these machines use nearly identical components; Forged connecting rods/crankshafts, chrome plated cast aluminum cylinders, etc. Their tolerances are so technically similar, the differences are not worth considering. In other words, what is required for lubrication is almost exactly the same."
So it stands to reason that when different mfgs recommend different ratios, the likely reason is to get you to buy their oil instead of another brand.
This is why I disagree with your statement - "The engine manufacturers recommendation is what you should go by."

I agree with that. But "very similar" does not equal "same".
The point that I am trying to make (and not doing so good) is that there are different brands, and qualities of oil. They are not all the same. Some labeled as 16:1, some 32:1, some 50:1 and others. The oils labeled at the higher ratios will _always_ be high quality oils. Oils labeled at the lower ratios _may_ _not_ be so high quality.
There are certain additives which allow oil to provide lubrication at higher temperatures and these additives are rather expensive. Much more so that the oil. So they use only the amount required based on the ratio that the oil will be mixed.
It is entirely possible that some mfgs market the exact same oil in different containers marked at various ratios. But I don't believe that is the norm.
Since there is no real way of knowing the quality of the oil short of its price and labeled ratio, I stand by my statement of using the recommendation on the oil label for the ratio.
Following your advice of using the mfgs recommendation over the label on the oil will lead to some expensive repairs. Consider the following. If you use 16:1 Homelite oil (known to be poor quality) and mix it at a 50:1 ratio, as Stihl recommends, and then use that mix in a Stihl it _will_ seize. On the other hand if you mix that same oil at 16:1 it will work in the Stihl. It will smoke a bit but it will provide enough lubrication. Given this scenario, it would seem that if you are not using the mfgs oil then you would be safer mixing according to the label on the oil as opposed to the equipment mfgs recommendation.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

What makes you think it is the exact same oil?
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Read my other reply
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dan wrote:

Your supposed to put oil in your gas with a two stroke engine? now I've heard everything! :-) Clark...
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dan wrote:

I've been using Lawn Boy ashless oil 32:1 in the lawnmower, Poulan chain saw and Troybilt trimmer with no problem. A couple of years ago I bought a gallon of 2 cycle oil, I believe Quaker State, and it kept clogging the carburetor on the lawnmower. I do believe that 2 cyle oils are different from this experience.
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On Thu, 06 Mar 2008 13:48:03 -0500, Frank

They are different. Some are formulated for air cooled engines (snow blowers ect.) and some for water cooled (outboards)
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dan wrote:

Make sure you use 2 stroke oil and not motor oil. 50:1 requires 2.56 ounces per gallon where 16:1 is 8 ounces. 32:1 is 4 ounces and that's what I use for everything. Not too smokey and plenty of lube. If you run at max rpms and max power all the time like in a chain saw you want more oil. If you run slower and lower power you need less like a leaf blower at half throttle or a weed whacker. Many applications where weight isn't a great factor, are converting to 4 strokes anyway for lower emissions. Your 2 stroke shouldn't smoke after it's warmed up.
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