wr36c03u-333 gas control valve

Have purchased (3) wr36c03u-333 gas control valves for my old furnace, and each of them lasted exactly 1 year. Presumedly, the 333mv unit only requires 333mv to the pilot, but I remember that it usually takes about 750mv to keep the pilot lit. This time I was lazy and forced the voltage to 1.4v with a battery; and the pilot still wouldn't stay lit when I released the knob. Kind of discouraging. The original unit lasted 20+ years. I replaced it because I started having to bang on it to get the main valve to open. Is there any way to get these things repaired or (or to repair them)? And are there any alternative units that will last longer than 1 year? --Frustrated
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yup.... a new furnace will last longer than 1 year. The better ones even com with a 10 year parts AND labor extended warranty.
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i like pauls assessment , your definitely in line for a darwin award ,
did you replace the powerpile when you replaced the valve????
dont ask me what a powerpile is, if you dont know, you shouldnt be dicking with it !!!!
snipped-for-privacy@toast.net wrote:

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So, instead of a milivolt generator, he wires it to a battery, and expect the pilot to stay on.... Hello Charles D!
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Christopher A. Young;
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Gas valves are replaced as a unit, not repaired. It sounds as if you have problems other than the gas valve. You should call a furnace repair company, and have them send out someone with experience.
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Without some sort of current limiting device hooking a battery to the valve may have damaged it if it wasn't already broken. It does seem like you must have some other issues that are causing these to go. One or two is bad luck, three is a bit many.
Theya re not intended to be repaired.
Most have ratings on them and you can adapt just about any standing pilot gas valve with the appropriate ratings to the task. Of course you're messing around with gas so if you blow up your house then you really have no one to blame but yourself.

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On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 15:57:53 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@toast.net wrote:

Sometimes you have to "bump" those valves with a bigger jolt. Try 120 volts from a lamp cord. If that doesnt work, try 240 volts from your air conditioner. Make sure you have lots of gas, propane and open flames when you try it. That should get you some heat. Bubba
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I'm not going to attack you, I'm just going to state the obvous: never, ever, under any circumstance add or modify any safeties to your furnace (of which the W/R gas valve has). In short, I do not sell parts over the counter because of situations described.
Right now, I do not have enuf info to even determine if your problem could be else where.
I actually like the millivolt systems. I have taken them apart, played with them...it is that part of me why I probably beame a tech. I would like you to post all the particulars: Model No. Serial No. etc...
Please, at the minimum: take my advice...any modifications beyond the OEM is dangerous. I understand your frustration, but this is like adding gasoline to the campfire in a group of Girl Scouts...It will get you arrested.
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Is this a wall furnace or floor furnace? I have seen a couple of centrals over 30 years ago that had millivolt controls. I cannot understand the reasoning behind that. On gravity floor/wall furnaces there is the benefit of not having to run 120 to the unit when it is installed, and, at least as important, having heat when the power is out. On a central, you have to have power for the blower anyway, and millivolt controls cost many times that of 24 volt. I have heard about antique gravity centrals, but never seen one. If the furnace in question is a gravity with no 120 volts and you have to stay with millivolt, there are other brands of millivolt available ( at least there were a few years ago-- we stopped working on floor furnaces about 20 years ago and wall furnaces 6-7 years ago). If 120 volts available, and power outages are not a big problem, you could convert to 24 volt. or even retrofit an auto ignition system if you want. More specifics on the furnace needed for more info on the best way to go. Larry
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