Wood Stoves

I recently installed a wood stove in my basement where there once was a fireplace. I have noticed that if I open the damper more than 1/2 way the pipe going to the flue gets red. Is this normal or sould it be avoided?
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I recently installed a wood stove in my basement where there once was a fireplace. I have noticed that if I open the damper more than 1/2 way the pipe going to the flue gets red. Is this normal or sould it be avoided?
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On Dec 12, 7:19 am, dherrle_at_roadrunner_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (Pegasus001) wrote:

If the pipe right off the Stove leading to the vertical flue pipe is running red...it is overheating for some reason. It is running extremely hot for it to glow red and of course is very dangerous. You could be exceeding the max. allowable temperature of the vertical flue pipe too which is a real safety hazard. Its time for an inspection or at the very least a professional cleaning of all piping associated with the Wood Stove installation. Could be loaded with creosote or could be a big restriction in it for some reason (animal, branches, leaves, etc...) . I once found a possum inside a vertical flue pipe that was completely covering the inside of the pipe ; he was still alive . Dont use the Wood Stove till its corrected.
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To answer the question rather than complain how you found your way here...
The flue from the stove should NEVER be red hot. It indicates too much air is feeding the fuel and you are likely overheating the stove. Either of 2 things can be done. Add a flue damper to slow the exhaust draft down. This will work but most prefered would be to be sure the stove is airtight and reduce the damper opening (combustion air) on the stove.
I am guessing the damper you mention is on the flue. So hopefully the stove has a combustion air damper too.
With women in the house attending to the stove while I am away at work (And I say this only because the 2 that live in my house refuse or do not comprehend the principals of how to control the heat.) I have left detailed instructions on how to read the magnetic thermometer that is stuck to the flue pipe. (I suggest you get one of these. Fairly cheap and a good indicator of how hot the flue gases are.) "If above 200F close the air down a little by moving the lever towards the floor" Your thermometer will likely be different than mine but you get the idea.
And for heavens sake find a book or website to read up on how to control a wood stove properly.

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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/hvac/Wood-Stoves-43199-.htm Pegasus001 wrote: Thank you all for your information. I just got te stove info off the UL tag and found that the stove is 30+ years old. The flue was cleaned at the time of installation & the pipe that leads to the flue is in good condition inside & out. The only two things I can think of is it's a balancing act between the pipe damper and air regulator on the stove. The other thing is that I burn BioBricks and they tend to burn hotter than firewood. Again thank you all for your information and have a Safe Holiday.
Krazy Old Man wrote:

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