Trane Heat Pump: Permanent 24v to Reversing Solenoid?

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Steve Cutchen wrote:

That's a Carrier stat. BTW, I'm trying to figure out exactly what your question is, and best I can tell you're wanting step by step instructions on how to hard wire the RV in. "Have your service tech" put O under R instead of Y, at the stat. There are no warranty issues because the system is already out of warranty. Do not attempt to rewire the old stat or any other HP stat back in yourself, as a dual fuel system requires extra controls that may or may not be installed. OTOH, you might be interested in knowing that RV noise is normal, excessive RV noise is not. You may have an indoor airflow restriction or an overcharge causing excessive head pressure in HP mode. I don't know your location, but in the Mid-South a HP is currently cheaper to run than a natural gas unit. Some people find the normal RV noise to be irritating, especially if the unit is poorly located. If this is the case, then you might keep in mind that Carrier offers a unit with a Quiet-Shift (TM) defrost board, especially for customers like you.
Richard Perry
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I'm a Trane dealer. Wiring the 24 volts to the reversing valve solenoid will NOT void the warranty, especially if you do it at the thermostat wiring connections on the outdoor unit. Just wire orange to red at that point. Yellow will continue to work the compressor contactor. Blue (Common) should always be connected. White can be disconnected in this application. Looks like he installed a new high efficiency gas furnace and indoor coil in place of the air handler. Probably didn't like the HP discharge temperature in heat mode. He wanted that warm feeling that gas gives him. Very understandable. He already had the heat pump outdoor unit & used it over. Nothing wrong with that. His dealer did a reasonable thing to use the heat pump outdoor unit over if it is not too old. The noise is the real problem here, unlikely that the reversing valve will stick. This is just a simple control issue. He does not need to throw lots of money at it buying a new condensing unit. On the other hand, if the outdoor unit is 15 years old, he should have been sold a new condensor by the dude who sold him the new furnace. But don't complicate things, have the furnace installer come back and rewire the controls. Remember, low sound levels are part of comfort.
PS. If you turn the HP breaker off, turn it on 24 hours before you start cooling to energize the crankcase heater so you will protect the compressor.
Stretch
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Thanks very much for the post.
The gas furnace was installed at the time the house was built. There was a kickback from the electric company if a HP was installed instead of a traditional AC, making it cheaper for the builder to install a HP thn to install a traditional unit. I'm not sure why they still installed a high efficiency gas furnace, unless there was a concern by the builder about the perceived comfort issues you mention below. I think they did not want to try to sell houses with electric emergency heat, and if they were doing a furnace anyway... well do a decent one.
This is Houston, and gas furnaces are an extremely high percentage of heat units, especially in moderate to expensive homes. Some entry homes are all electric, and these have been going HP for a while. But it is pretty rare.

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Swap it out with a manual valve. Don't forget to change it over every Spring and Fall.
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Easy fix. Remove the Reversing valve and pipe the suction line directly to the suction line going to the compressor and then pipe the liquid line where that needs to go , now you have no heat pump. Install a contactor so it will energize fan and compressor at the same time easy HUh? It will work and no more discussion is really required. Or just bite the bullet, donate your HP to a needy family or charity, take your tax deduction for the price of the heat pump then have a friggin Ac installed. Both of these will solve your problems.
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Bob Pietrangelo
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This is a good idea, but costly compared to wiring 24V to the solenoid. Still I appreciate the suggestion because if the valve ever does fail I could simply have sections of tubing installed rather than having a new RV put in.
This is a big deal, because installing an RV in the field is a PITA, what with nylon parts in the valve so close to where the heating is taking place. I've read that some techs will not even try to do it in the field because of the difficulty in getting it done without screwing up the valve internals.
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If the reversing valve fails after 10 years, it is more economical usually to replace the HP. In your case with a straight A/C condensor for just cooling. Make sure your new condensor matches the indoor coil, or replace it at the same time to match.
Stretch
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Steve@carolinabreezehvac wrote:

Better tell Trane and Honeywell, 'cause that's how the XR series HP works off the shelf.
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You could always just shut off the breaker for the HP
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Brilliant !
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Heh.
Just half the breaker... I still need the Cool Pump part to work...
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Are you using AC right now? If you want the rev valve permanently energized without the swoosh of it swithing over, just wire one lead of the solenoid to the red wire coming from outside, and the common wire outside. On a heatpuimp you almost always have hot and common at teh defrost board. After you dun the AC for the first time it should stay there. My idea of turning off the breaker is I didn't think you needed ac yet. If you don't just turn the breaker on when you are ready to use the AC. Rewiring the internal controls of your HP voids all warranties.
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