Thermostat Problem

I had a Lenox G61MPV gas furnace installed a month ago along with a White Rogers 1F80-361 programmable thermostat. At night, I turn the thermostat down to 58 degrees. In the morning I turn it up to 66.
Throughout the day, the thermostat works well, keeping the room temperature within about 1 degree of the thermostat setting. But first thing in the morning, when the furnace has to raise the room temperature from 58 to 66 degrees, it overshoots the mark by almost 5 degrees before the furnace shuts off. I've tried two different thermostats and both of them do the same thing. Adjusting the Temperature Display Adjustment up a few degrees, helps some, but the room temperature gets too low before the furnace comes on when I do this. It seems to me that the temperature sensor inside the thermostat is too slow to adjust to the actual room temperature, so the furnace stays on too long when it has make up more than 1-2 degrees. My furnace installer just keeps telling me to try another thermostat, that the problem isn't the furnace. Anyone have any ideas?
thanks, Craig
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try another installer
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ya thats it..go from one moron to the next.
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Not the sensor in the thermostat.
Furnace oversized?
There may be an 'anticipator' adjustment in your thermostat. Check the paperwork that came with it. It's purpose is to shutdown the furnace early in "anticipation" of the extra heat.
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 09:44:02 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@twcny.rr.com"

Exactly how cheap did you get this install that only a month old and the installer wont come back out and fix it right? You want to tell us another "story"? Bubba
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snipped-for-privacy@twcny.rr.com wrote:

The model you have *may* come with an adjustment on the control board for the indoor blower timeing. You might check to see if it's 120 seconds and can be adjusted down to 90 seconds. Residual heat [in the furance] will raise the room temperature if the fan is on too long.
Call your installing contractor, and see if he can't adjust the timing under a warranty call - [or maybe have him come out, check everything over - and adjust the timing and pay their service call fee.]
--
Zyp



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The amount of heat extracted from the HX from running the blower an extra 30 seconds beyond 90 will not raise the room temp enough to notice, unless the only room with an open register is a closet.
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snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net wrote:

I'm not sure even then.
--
Zyp



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snipped-for-privacy@twcny.rr.com wrote: ...

...
Next time you have a chance, watch the thermostat. It probably has an indicator on it that indicates when heat is being called for. Try and notice if when the set temp is being passed, is indicator still showing call for heat? If it isn't, is the blower fan on the furnace still running?
If the fan still runs after call for heat has stopped, it's a setting in the furnace, not likely the thermostat.
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I seem to recall that some White-Rodgers tstats measure wall temperature as well as air temperature. The reason is, when the air temp is changing during a recovery phase, the decision to end the call for heat (or cool) is based on how much wall temp lags behind the air temp. For example, starting from 58, the wall is still cold when the air has warmed to 66. If the tstat shuts the furnace down as soon as the air reaches 66, the air will rapidly cool off again as heat is transfered to the wall (and furniture), and the tstat will just have to call for more heat sooner than later, starting the cycle over again. Running the furnace longer during recovery gets the walls and furniture up to temperature faster, which increases comfort, even if it means overshooting the air temp by a degree or two for a few minutes.
Cold air from inside the wall can confuse the tstat into thinking the wall surface is colder than it is, so don't mount the tstat on an exterior wall, and make sure the hole in the wall behind the thermostat is plugged with some insulating material around the wires. Even if the tstat does not have this additional sensor I spoke of, these two things are good advice.
Also, consult your owner's manual for information about the "heating cycle rate" configuration of your W-R 1F80-361. In your case, you may be better off with the "FA" setting as opposed to the "SL" setting.
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Are you reptilian?
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Set it back to factory defaults and leave it alone.
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