temperature swing value

What is a typical number of degrees for the temperature swing for a programmable thermostat? Would adding three degrees save noticeably (say, five to ten percent) on the heat and cooling bill?
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Tony Sivori


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1 degree

no
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Noon-Air wrote:

... or less

I don't know about 5-10%, but it might result in noticeable savings.

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CJT wrote:

Would it save more with the central air than the gas heat? I'm no pro (obviously), but it is my understanding that the compressor draws the most amps on start ups.
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Tony Sivori wrote:

very nice feature of the t'stat I have (a Honeywell) is it's apparently intelligent about short-cycling, which can damage a compressor. I don't know to what extent it optimizes compressor use, but my bills have definitely come down, and I attribute at least part of that to the t'stat (although I've also patched some leaky ductwork and made other changes that probably helped even more).
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wrote:

no
It takes a whole lot less energy to *maintain* a constant, even temperature than it does to keep jacking around with the temperature. In my neck of the woods, if you leave the a/c off for an 8 our work day, it takes a full 24 hours to bring the temperature and humidity levels back into your comfort range. Remember, you not just cooling the air, but everything in the house...walls, floors, ceilings, furniture, peoples, puppies, kitties, etc.
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Noon-Air wrote:

Thanks for the info.

A great idea, while it lasted.
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Tony Sivori wrote:

in the operating SEER because starting and stopping, or short cycling, wastes energy to get the evaporator cold, and/or, the heat exchanger in a gas or oil furnace hot enough to deliver warm air to the conditioned space.
This is a major reason why the proper BTUH sizing of equipment is so important to efficient operation. It extends the run-time & reduces the number of start-up cycles. My old oil furnace runs a long time using fuel, too much of which goes up the chimney before it the blower kicks in. - udarrell
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