Refrigerant ex[plosion


For those silly enough to think that can use propane as refrigerant in an air conditioning unit.
I got an e-Mail in from a friend who said "It was only a 2hp unit about 3kgs of propane".
It caused quote an explosion.
BTW 3 Kg would be a bit more that 6 pounds.
https://au.news.yahoo.com/video/watch/24686739/baby-wallabies-meet-new-mums/
Normal refrigerants do not explode nor burn..
Ammonia does but you would be a hero to use that. It does not like copper and it is poisonous.
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A couple of the old meat packing/cutting plants near me in NYC in the "meat packing district", which were taking in trailer loads of beef and slicing/dicing for local markets, were still in operation as late as five years ago. And yes, many used ammonia...
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"danny burstein" wrote in message of Baal> writes: >> Normal refrigerants do not explode nor burn.. >> Ammonia does but you would be a hero to use that. It does not like copper

Ammonia is a terrifically good refrigerant, but not for air conditioning.
As a refrigerant it is quite efficient.
In homes it is generally limited to absorption type refrigerators (where heat causes cooling)
Ammonia burns It explodes It turns to bad caustic when it mixes with moisture (in the eyes, nose & lungs.) It attacks copper.
Usually in plants where ammonia is used they have protection devices. Trust me you do not want to be around when it leaks out.
http://www.achrnews.com/articles/three-common-ammonia-refrigerant-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them
//Ammonia refrigerant also has many applications, such as use in industrial facilities like meat, poultry, and fish processing plants, dairy and ice cream plants, wineries and breweries, soft drink processing facilities, and cold storage warehouses.
When handled properly, ammonia refrigerants are very friendly, efficient, and versatile. But, like many other chemicals, ammonia must be handled with care. If it is not, it can have health consequences for the technician and others. Ammonia is labeled as a high health hazard because it is corrosive to the skin, eyes, and lungs. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), “Exposure to 300 ppm is immediately dangerous to life and health. Ammonia is also flammable at concentrations of approximately 15 to 28 percent by volume in air. When mixed with lubricating oils, its flammable concentration range is increased. It can explode if released in an enclosed space with a source of ignition present, or if a vessel containing anhydrous ammonia is exposed to fire.”\\
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On 8/11/2014 12:30 PM, RamRod wrote:

Add Ice plants to your list of ammonia users. Also one problem with ammonia now, people use it as part of the meth making chemistry. I worked in a building that also housed the office for an ice plant. They stored the ammonia bottles in the ice making plant near the office. They had several bottles stolen, don't think they ever caught anyone. Mikek
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Another use for ammonia:
http://pipeline.corante.com/archives/things_i_wont_work_with/
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