really quiet central AC/dehumidifier?

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I have only about 1000 sq ft of house to cool. I live in NY State. Very damp here, and in the summer, hot.
I'm willing to pay more for central AC/dehumidifier that's really quiet. What would be a good quiet model?
thanks Laura
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One thats installed by a *competent*, licensed, insured, professionally trained, HVAC technician.
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On Jun 24, 9:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@cyberspace.org (Graven Water) wrote:

Central AC is a dehumidifier, if AC is oversized and short cycles you dont dehumidify in which case a stand alone unit is good. Quiet is an instalers job. You need a load calculation no guessing on size
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snipped-for-privacy@cyberspace.org (Graven Water) wrote:

Look into a "split system" A/C unit. There is probably one for your size of the house, and having half the guts of the thing outside keeps most of the noise out of your home.
-john-
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(Graven Water) wrote:

What do you *think* central AC is???
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In (Graven Water) wrote:

I ->think he's talking about the sort which doesn't use ductwork.
The compressor is outside, the condenser/fan is inside, looking like a truncated conventional window AC unit, but these are usually intended to cool a single room, while the OP is talking about cooling a (small) house.
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(Graven Water) wrote:

That's a ductless split...
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Graven Water posted for all of us...

Didn't you ask this before? Contact Stumpy; he is up there and it will be soooo quiet because it will never run.
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The split-sytem idea seems like a good one. I don't think ductless would work because my house has 2 floors and ductwork would be needed to circulate the air well. Maybe one can use the house heater fan for the AC and not have to get a separate fan?
I do want something that's a dehumidifier as well as AC, because often it's damp here and not hot - the other day it was 67 F and 72% humidity. So I need to be able to turn on a dehumidifying function separately from the AC.
No, I haven't asked this before. Looking on google I'd found some models of central AC advertised as quiet, about 65 dB (meaning dBA I guess). Those are probably for a larger house than mine, and maybe I could find a quieter one. It would be in my garage. The heater fan is in my garage, it is about 50 dBA and that's plenty loud, the garage is next to my living space. I suppose the compressor the main noise you get from an AC, the fan noise is not so bad.
thanks Laura
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The noise level is for the outdoor unit. The split system would use your existing blower, so it wouldn't be any louder than having your furnace operating.
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Or maybe you can have the whole AC outside, routing its cold air through the heater ductwork. If I had something 65 dBA outside, it should be pretty quiet indoors.
Laura
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For allergies one is supposed to have humidity about 50%. Are there central ac/dehumidifier units that will do this? Looking around I see a lot of portable ac/dehumidifiers, but not central ones.
Laura
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Every central AC (or mini split) will reduce the humidity. Passing air through a cold coil will condense some of the humidity out of the air.
What is the heat source in your house? If it's a hot air forced furnace, you're a candidate for central AC to be added. I know, I did this for six years, working for someone else. And several AC add ons for friends of mine.
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I get the impression, reading around, that a central AC can't dehumidify without cooling, because the condenser, which is what would heat the air in a dehumidifier, is outside, being cooled by outside air.
It should be possible to expose the condenser to outside air or to the inside air, depending on whether you want just dehumidification, which would heat the air, or air conditioning. So I don't know why a central AC couldn't also be a dehumidifier. It would have to have a humidity sensor of course. For my purposes it'd have to be able to reduce the humidity to 50%.
Laura
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A *competent* HVAC tech would have already explained all that to you, and would have built in humidity controls as a standard offering. Keep in mind that on most normal resi installations, if the system is designed, sized, and installed correctly, it will have no problem maintaining 75 degrees with 50% humidity.
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That would be a ductwork nightmare. I've heard of systems that can run AC to get the humidity percentage, and then run the furnace as needed, to keep the temp from being too cold. That's wasteful, of course.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

What are you talking about Stormin? What would be a duct work nightmare?
To be quite frank [honest] a reputable refrigeration tech could easily build a add on to your system, but running a third pipe, bringing hot gas to a indoor coil that is installed after the evaporator. The subsequent liquid discharge from the reheat coil could be piped [using a check valve] directly to the indoor evaporator metering device, the suction would remain going to the outdoor condenser / compressor section with a solenoid valve that could change the hot gas direction from the outdoor condenser coil to the indoor reheat coil.
The only problem, is you would have more heat coming into the home than is being removed, but the result is dehumidified air. Using a P/E chart, the difference would be the heat of compression [and added electrical heat from the compressor] would be added to the air as it left the system. Eventually the system would have to change over to nominal air conditioning to 'remove' the added heat, and then could [if the humidistat is not satisfied] return to dehumidification.
Get your credit card out though.
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I was getting visions of ducting the indoor air to the condensor, and then the hot blast from the condensor into the house.
The condensor in the duct work could be done. If there was some kind of thermostat and a variation on a heat pump reversing valve. Divert the heat into the air stream when the house needed the heat. I've never seen one, but it sure seems possible. Great idea, chief.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Stormy;
I just explained how a dehumidifier works.... read above. The only ducting needed would be maybe a transition between the reheat coil and the evaporator. The rest would be refrigerant piping so the hot gas discharge could reheat the cold supply air from the evaporator coil. The actually temperature leaving the system during dehumidification would be a little warmer than the air going in. The humidity of the air leaving would be considerably less. A psychometric chart would be used to determine the effectiveness of the system.
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Zyp



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You did describe a whole house dehumidifier. And, then, I described my mental concept, ducting the hot blast from the condenser into the house. And now you're explaining again. How many times would you like to do this? I mean, you're light on your feet, but my dancing abilities are limited.
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