Radiator use as a cooling coil

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A friend has recommended I use an old radiator hooked up to the water supply as an AC with my furnace. He swears it works as his dad used one. Since the tap water is approx 55F in the summer it seems feasible to me. Where should the "coil" be installed? In the plenum or return air supply? BTW: Water is not metered here.
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ask your friend or his dad moron, since they swear it works
tell me do your brains rattle when you roll over in bed?
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Roy wrote:

I've also thought about this idea. I kind of think that the humidity would get to you after awhile, even though it is cooling off your house. The plenum of the furnace would seem to be the logical choice because you're directly blowing the air into you home. Still, the humidity....
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How would you get humidity off a radiator? It's a closed system. Or, should be. That would be like getting humidity from under the hood of your car. Which is a closed system, or should be.
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

The humidity would be formed by the cold water (whether it be well-water or town/city water) which is colder than the ambient air temperature. While this water passed through your pipes and your radiator, water would condense on the outside of the rad/piping and your furnace fan would blow this into your home, hence increasing the houses' humidity.
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I think you will find that more water is removed from the air than put into the air. In any case, read what you wrote again. Supposing that there are five galons a day of water condensed out of the air. And that one of those galons of water is sprayed back into the house.
five galons out
one galon put back
Now, was that a loss, or a gain? If anything you'd have to deal with LESS humidity in the house. Which, summer time, isn't a bad thing.
You will need a drain under the radiator, in order to deal with the CONDENSATE, which results from condensing humidity. The only way to add humidity would be for the water flow from the city water to be leaking.
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Christopher A. Young
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unadulterated horseshit. I suppose you've never heard of chilled water cooling coils, drain pans and condensate drains.
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I've been wondering where all that added water comes from. Jimmy figures to condense air out of the return, reevaporate it into the supply and some how that increases humidity.
Well, to a less seasoned tech, the thought of all that water spraying into the air sure looks like increased humidity.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 16:39:02 GMT, "Stormin Mormon"

Perpetual motion?
No way.
You are right, Chris.
(I hate to say it)
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-john
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I stand corrected and apologize for wasting bandwidth as well as usenet space.
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The typical HVAC on large buildings use water provide heat to exterior zones. Chilled water coils are also common.
It should be mounted on the supply side.
A radiator would not work worth beans. The correct coil and controls are normal in stock parts and would remove 10x the heat and might even cost less installed.
GL Dan
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Where would I purchase the coil?
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Just about any HVAC vendor. Places that supply materials for commercial work in my area they are in stock parts.
You will not have condensation with chilled water system coils.
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If the temp of the coil is lower than the air passing through the coil.... I'd expect condensation.
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Christopher A. Young
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you mean if the temp of the coil is below dew point??
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wrote:

You're talking about ADP (apparatus dew point), no?
Initially, condensation may occur, but that's not all there is to it.
ADP is DP at coil temp. If air exiting coil is below ADP, you will have surface condensation. However, you still may not have a wet coil. Carryover threshold is what, about 550 FPM face velocity?
It doesn't matter whether you're using a chilled water loop, or direct expansion. It's all about ADP vs airflow and split, and air entering condition. Air exiting condition is a function of these.
For dehumidification to occur, condensation rate must overcome carryover due to friction drag. If carryover exceeds condensation volume, then no dehumidification occurs, and therefore, no drippage from the coil. It's a simple as that.
To the devil with your flooded ammonia and steam ejector systems, anyway. This is resi HVAC, no?
Give me a fucking break, Stormy.
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-john
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Stormy,
If you don't understand physics, then take one. It will clear your head, or wherever your brains are.
Bob
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Back to the original poster...
You could do a web search for information on deep well systems. Try: "deep" "well" "water" "air" "conditioning"
Dan
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