R417a when in the presence of a flame; deadly ?

An open flame in the presence of R22 creates deadly phosgene gas . How about R417a which seems to be the favorite drop in replacement for R22 ?
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http://www.bocsds.com/uk/sds/special/isceon_mo59.pdf
http://www.refrigerants.com/MSDS/r417A.pdf
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wrote:

    All I know is, I wanna blow shit up.
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On 4/23/2011 2:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Of course it does.
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It is hardly too strong to say that the Constitution was made to guard
the people against the dangers of good intentions. There are men in all
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On Apr 23, 5:25 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Any flourocarbon refrigerant in the presence of a flame produces deadly phosgene gas . Phosgene gas was also used in WW2 by the Germans i believe.
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On Apr 24, 2:55 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com" <Dimwitted Dave> wrote:

Now Dimwitted Dave think he's a chemist. How you posting a reaction formula showing that "any flourocarbon refrigerant" when burned, produces phosgene gas (COCL2) when R417a has NO Chlorine atoms in it's mixture, FOOL? Oh yeah, you don't answer questions
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<Dimwitted Dave> wrote:

Now Dimwitted Dave think he's a chemist. How you posting a reaction formula showing that "any flourocarbon refrigerant" when burned, produces phosgene gas (COCL2) when R417a has NO Chlorine atoms in it's mixture, FOOL? Oh yeah, you don't answer questions
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He doesn't have a clue about refrigerant properties and what happens when different refrigerants are exposed to heat (decomposition).
The issue with HFC refrigerants when heated, is Hydrofluoric Acid and Hydrogen Fluoride. Both are *very* nasty.
Hydrogen fluoride gas is a severe poison that may immediately and permanently damage lungs and the corneas of the eyes. Water solutions (hydrofluoric acid) are a contact-poison with the potential for deep, initially painless burns, with later tissue death. By interfering with body calcium metabolism, the concentrated acid may also cause systemic toxicity and eventual cardiac arrest and fatality, after contact with as little as 160 cm2 (24.8 square inches) of skin.
Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/hydrofluoric-acid#ixzz1KYXf0nDw
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HF is nasty stuff, in any form. Even dissolves glass (SiO2)
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On 4/25/2011 11:01 AM, ken wrote:

It is still toxic when flamed. When was the last time you read the Anarchist Handbook? Dammit Paul ..Are you letting reasonable people into our NG again?

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