Pumping condensate from air conditioning evaporator

I am installing a split easy-fit air conditioning system in my house, and I have a need for the pipework between the indoor and outdoor unit to go above the height of the indoor evaporator (basically, up into the loft, and then across to the external wall).
I believe that I need to install a small condensate pump to assist the flow of drained condensate. (it only needs to pump about 12 inches above the height of the evaporator).
My question is... does the condensate pump have to be installed at a similar height to the bottom of the evaporator unit? i.e. at the same level as the contents of the drainage reservoir in the evaporator? Or can it be installed at a higher level, and somehow maintain a head of water to syphon the condensate from the evaporator?
Also, I noticed that most of the mini condensate pumps seem to come as two parts, one of which can be fitted within the evaporator's drainage tray, and one that can be put into trunking in line with the drainage tube. Is this an either/or option? I don't particularly want to take the evaporator apart and install things in it, so I'd like to just have something in the trunking.
Thanks for any suggestions / advice!
James
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You can put it up to 29 (actually, 29.92) inches above the drain pan on the evaporator. Water will flow upward due to capillary action. You need to use a small diameter, rigid plastic pipe. You've heard us talk about 29 inches of vacuum - same concept.

All you need to do is make sure that the condensate pump side of the capillary tube stays under water in the pump.
Good luck on your project!
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COUGH! So, his evaporator condenses liquid mercury, not water? Oh.... how small does that rigid plastic pipe need to be? Two thousanths bore; three?.

Yep, with a capillary tube on the suction side, you should be able to pump maybe a gallon a month.
Who ARE you? Why are you giving advice. You're even less qualified than I am to do it.
(Or are you pulling this guy's leg -- and wallet?)
LLoyd
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Most small condensate pumps are not self priming and need to be installed so that they are submerged in water to work. If you must have the pump above then you will need to use a self priming pump and a remote float switch. Self priming pumps are more expensive and usually don't have the life expectancy of none self priming pumps.
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