Power Consmption for my split-ac unit

I had a split ac unit installed in my condo a few weeks ago. Since my build ing is older, there was no power outlet outside on our balcony. So the inst allers modified my baseboard to use its power instead. They installed a sma ll switch that I flip on or off depending on if I want to use my AC or the baseboard heater.
To make this work, I also need to set the thermostat in that room to max at all times. Even if the unit is currently not running.
My question is, does the thermostat being on max, even when the AC is off, consume energy? In other words, am I paying for electricity even when my AC unit is off?
Thanks for the clarification.
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On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 5:38:18 PM UTC-4, KA wrote:

lding is older, there was no power outlet outside on our balcony. So the in stallers modified my baseboard to use its power instead. They installed a s mall switch that I flip on or off depending on if I want to use my AC or th e baseboard heater.

at all times. Even if the unit is currently not running.

, consume energy? In other words, am I paying for electricity even when my AC unit is off?

Nope. That thermostat is just an on/off switch. They installed a Y switch downstream from that to divert power to the ac instead of the base board.
Did they offer to install a heat pump instead of an ac? You could have got ten rid of the base board with a heat pump.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

Doesn't that depend on the climate?
Back around 1976 we built a new house in the upper midwest and installed a heat pump (plus sufficient central electric to cover the cold days when the heat-pump couldn't keep up). Ended up with 400A service in the house for the electric backup heat, and it got used for a few years until gas was run through the subdivision, when the backup electric was replaced by gas and the heat pump was replaced by an AC compressor and saved a bunch on the electric bill.
If it got too cold (e.g. below 32F/0C), the heat pump was useless. Modern heat pumps may be different, that was almost forty years ago.
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On Thursday, June 5, 2014 12:54:08 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:

If you go far enough north, you are right, heat pumps aren't worth much. But they are a lot better now than they were 40 years ago.
I think right now the most cost effective is high efficiency heat pump with natural gas back up. If you have gas available. Initial costs are a bit more though.
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It depend if power going to Heater is control remotely that goes to heater itself . Now if power is control remotely yes you will need for Tst. be all way up. Now if you power is fed directly to heater and Tst. is located at heater Assy. , then it does not matter on what setting is the Tst. set on. I believe what your Tst. is located on the wall which means that you have remote control.
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