Lennox Furnace drain issue

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Hi, I purchased a new high effiency Lennox G61V furnace a year ago, and have had problems ever since. After numerous visits from the installer, we've finally determined that water from the cold header box (which sit directly behind the combustion inducer fan), does not drain out until the furnace shuts down. So, basically if it is cold outside and the furnace runs for several hours straight, that water continues to build up and gets into the inducer fan, which cause all kinds of problems, and the furnace shuts down.
The service people I've used have called lennox, but can not figure out why the water would not drain out until the furnace winds down or is shut off.
Has anyone run into this issue before? I'm a good $1000 in on maintenance fees right now and I'm not sure what to do at this point. thanks, Joe
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Was it the lowest price?? Seems that one of the first things they cut corners on is not putting a proper trap in the drain line. There is a reason for the trap being there....looks like you found out about it the hard way.
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wrote:

The trap is incorporated into the furnace at the factory. He is not talking about the trap on the a coil. Which BTW isn't needed on a up flow furnace you dolt.
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Having never worked on that particular model, I'll take you word for it... Either way, from the symptoms, there are issues with the trap either being partially blocked or not being deep enough.
Now....as far as a trap on an upflow coil, Rheem/RUUD *REQUIRES* that there be a trap that a minimum of 6 inches below the coil pan, and the trap must be a minimum of 3 inches deep. There is a reason the factory puts notes in the installation instructions and puts a sticker on the coil and/or coil casing that gives the dimentions of the required trap. I have seen the same trap requirements for Carrier and Trane. Not only do they give the dimentions, but they also include pictures...*just* for you.
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wrote:

I agree that it sounds like a trap problem or possibly a venting issue with the pitch of the pipe. Its not a field fabricated trap. Like all 90 plus furnaces, the trap comes with the furnace.

I don't know why they would make it a requirement since it has nothing to do with condensate drainage on an up flow.
Blow thru coils don't need a trap to drain properly. Pull thru coils do.
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I didn't write the installation instructions.... but I do actually *READ* them, and follow them. So far, I have never seen installation instructions that said that traps were only for "pull through coils". Maybe you could show me where installation instructions say that traps are only required for "blow through" evap coils?? or maybe give me a code site??
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wrote:

It doesn't have anything to do with codes or installation instructions. It has to do with the static pressure across the coil and drain pan. As you full well know, or should know, when a blower is downstream (pull thru) of the evap coil it wont drain until the blower shuts off. When the blower is upstream of the coil it will drain just fine regardless of if its trapped or not.
So why do they want a trap on an up flow? I suspect its just over kill.
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om...
Alright, since this is a Usenet group, I can't email or load photos (thanks google). King, can I just emial you a picture of the front of the furance so you can see if anything look incorrect? Also can you explain your comment above further (I am rookie on this stuff right now). I have an upflow furnace, the exhaust pipe is above the blower. So I agree with you, why do I even need a trap, I don't see how any fumes would go anywhere but up. thx.
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2008 19:13:20 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Were talking two different traps. One for the A/C condensate and the one for the furnace condensate. You need the trap for the furnace condensate. Make sure the trap is clean, make sure the exhaust is pitched back towards the furnace 1/4 inch per liner foot with no sags, make sure there are no kinks in any drain lines, make sure there are no blockages in any drain lines inside and outside of the furnace.
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s.com...
I see. this situation does not seem to be a problem with the exhaust condensation/ drainage, and I have check the 1/4 inch decline on the pipe. The cold header box behind the inducer fan does not drain (although I can hear water in there) until the furnace shuts down.
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2008 07:05:53 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sorry but there is a problem with the exhaust condensate drainage.

Wheres the pics?
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oups.com...
I just send you the pictures. Also wanted to mention the error code that occurs is 2 + 5 "High Pressure Switch Failed open. Check blocked inlet/exhaust or condensate line (condensing furnaces only)"
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 09:14:43 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Ill bet money there is a problem with the trap. have the tech bring out a new one and see what happens.
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 17:17:31 -0500, The King

Scratch that since its been replaced twice. Have Lennox replace the furnace. :)
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legroups.com...
Yep, going back to my installer is all I can do at this point, fun times. Get to confirm something, is water from that cold header box supposed to drain out while the furnace is running? With that inducer fan going, wouldn't I expect the fan suction to hold that water in the box while it's spinning?
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 16:21:38 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: snip

Yes
That's what the trap is for.
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Yes

So, your point here is the trap will stop that suction even though the water in the cold head box is slightly above the water in the condensate trap? I'm not sure if a good seal can be made with that set up. I thought these traps were to stop any residual exhaust gas from traveling into the house.
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wrote:

Yes

So, your point here is the trap will stop that suction even though the water in the cold head box is slightly above the water in the condensate trap? I'm not sure if a good seal can be made with that set up. I thought these traps were to stop any residual exhaust gas from traveling into the house.
------------------------------------------
Thats what you get for thinking. The trap has to be *BELOW* where the water is coming from, and its to allow the water to drain even though there is a pressure difference between where its coming from and where its going to.
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So, your point here is the trap will stop that suction even though the water in the cold head box is slightly above the water in the condensate trap? I'm not sure if a good seal can be made with that set up. I thought these traps were to stop any residual exhaust gas from traveling into the house.
============= The trap stops air from traveling from one area to the other.
The traps are dual purpose, lets the unit drain and stops CO from entering your home.
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Is there any trick to replacing the trap? Does it need to be done by a pro or can I do it myself?
My trap is cracked and leaking, see pics: http://farrelltcs.com/furnace
Thanks!
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