is there anyway to disassemble a window a/c and coils farther from the unit?

basically i have several computers running in a cabinet in my closet and i want to a/c the cab, but i don't want hot air and water dumping into the room, nor do i want an ugly floor unit sitting there.
directly above the cabinet is my attic space, so i want to disassemble a window unit, so i can take the cold side and extend the tubing into my cabinet, then mount a fan on the coils so it will blow cold air.
the compressor and condenser will stay in the attic and just dump the heat into there where there is already an upward flow of heat from the house. i know i'll have to deal with the water, but a 1/2 gal container should keep from having to dump the water too often.
is something like this possible because i know compressors are designed to work with a certain length of tubing.
thanks, daniel.
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Oh boy! Won't you be the pride of the neighborhood when you get this contraption/abortion finished?
Don't worry about fire insurance or UL, nor any other building codes...
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Several big problems. 1) The A/C is a sealed system. If you cut the tubing to extend it, you'll need all sorts of gauges, tools, refrigerant, oil and a vacuum pump to reassemble it. Along with the knowledge of how to use all of them correctly.
2) You are correct that the length of tubing may be critical; add to that you may run into problems with the oil pooling in the vertically lower evaporator.
3) You're aware of potential water problems; you might get icing instead.
4) Temperature control may be a problem since you may have to extend a thermostat that is not simply an electrical on/off switch.
Alternatives are the smallest mini-split A/C you can find (will require professional installation), using water cooled CPU/Video chip heat sinks, or adding louvers to the closet door and perhaps adding a fan to force air through the closet.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Thanks man, it seems the other poster was correct, but he apparently like to be difficult.
i appreciate you explanation and have looked into a split a/c system but they're pretty bulky and even the smallest one is far beyond my cooling needs.
Right now I have the air in the cab exchanging every few minutes thanks to a 440cfm Elicent fan. Bennett Price wrote:

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wrote:

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Somewhere in that gibberish he had an opinion.
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<Al Moran> wrote in message wrote:

Yes and there is always one JACKASS that hardly can hold screwdriver in his hand that want to others look bad but that works only for short period of time and some time not even that have nice day Dido
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I'd say something but I have no clue what you just said, just more gibberish I guess.
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Once again, Dildo, you are SO CLOSE to making sense!
--
Respectfully, Bob

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Al Moran wrote

I believe the stunned wonder know as "Dildo" is telling him to use pre- connected lines, more great advice from the Epsilon Minus gallery!
--
Respectfully, Bob

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It's easy. Just get two identical air conditioners. You'll need two because when you take them apart, you will notice that there's only one motor for the evaporator and condenser. After you've taken them apart, use your recovery system to recover all the refrigerant from both of them. You'll first need to install a temporary recovery port, as you'll find that there is none as the units come from the factory.
Next put the unit that you plan on using as the condenser in the attic. Put the unit you plan on using as the evaporator / air handler in your closet. Make sure that you remove the condenser fan blade from the unit, as you will find that it's designed to sling the condensate over the condenser coil as a means of improving efficiency, and eliminating the need to have the condensate drip out of it. Now design something to collect the condensate. You should pump the condensate to the condenser, and allow the water to be slung as per the original design.
Now run the new line set, and hook er up. You will need to come up with an oil separator, and a pump system to get the oil back up to the compressor, as it will pool in the evaporator. Call the manufacturer of the air conditioners, and ask their engineers what the recommended charge and oil volume is when you convert the system to split operation. They'll need to know your line size and length, and what method you are now using for metering. They might need to know what volume accumulator, oil separator, and dryer you used for your redesign.
Next is the electrical portion. You will need to control the (now split) compressor, and evaporator / condenser fans, along with the oil pump. A new digital thermostat, and appropriate contactors ought to do it.
Pretty simple, and straight forward. Why go out and buy a split system when you can spend a bunch of time and convert a couple of window shakers for about twice the price?
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Just get two identical air conditioners. You'll need two because when you take them apart, you will notice that there's only one motor for the evaporator and condenser.
Before you cut any copper lines..... use your recovery system to recover all the refrigerant from both of them. You'll first need to install a temporary recovery port, as you'll find that there is none as the units come from the factory.
Next put the unit that you plan on using as the condenser in the attic. Put the unit you plan on using as the evaporator / air handler in your closet.
Make sure that you remove the condenser fan blade from the closet unit, as you will find that it's designed to sling the condensate over the condenser coil as a means of improving efficiency, and eliminating the need to have the condensate drip out of it. Or, leave the blade on, as it provides necessary weight for the motor.
Now design something to collect the condensate. Drill a hole in the tray at the base of the closet unit. Look for a tube which drains the water from under the cold coil. Splice into this tube, and put a condensate pump below the closet AC. You should pump the condensate to the condenser, and allow the water to be slung as per the original design. We presume you have good air turnover in the attic, as you'll be pumping a bunch of humidity up there.
Now run the new line set, and hook er up. You'll want an insulated suction line. If you want really good subcooling, tape the lines together, and insulate around both of them. 1/4 and 3/8 copper should work well. You will need to come up with an oil separator, and a pump system to get the oil back up to the compressor, as it will pool in the evaporator. Call the manufacturer of the air conditioners, and ask their engineers what the recommended charge and oil volume is when you convert the system to split operation. They'll need to know your line size and length, and what method you are now using for metering. They might need to know what volume accumulator, oil separator, and dryer you used for your redesign.
You may wish to charge by gage pressures, and superheat. Which would be the best way to go. Charge by weight will be uncertain.
Definitely remove the evaporator fan blade from the AC in the attic. Fairly light weight, and not needed.
Next is the electrical portion. You will need to control the (now split) compressor, and evaporator / condenser fans, along with the oil pump. A new digital thermostat, and appropriate contactors ought to do it. You'll also need a transformer to supply power to the T-stat, and the contactors.
Pretty simple, and straight forward. Why go out and buy a split system when you can spend a bunch of time and convert a couple of window shakers for about twice the price? The adventure is what counts.
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Yeah..... I hadn't thought about the adventure part. Thanks for the addition. I think we've scared him off.
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I had a similar problem several years back. My dual graphics card computer was getting hot even though it was in a very comfortable room (70 degrees.)
Instead of going through all the trouble you are describing, I punched a (small) hole in the wall behind the computer. Then I ran a some one inch plastic conduit up through the wall, into the attic and attached it to the existing AC plenum. The other end I fastend to a vent opening on the computer case. It was enough to keep the computer running 24/7 for several years.
The key was getting discharge temperature air (around 52 degrees or so) directly where it was needed most. You might be able to adapt a similar solution to your cabinet, perhaps with drier hose or similar.
Cheers!
Jim
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C O N D E N S A T I O N
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Condensation was never an issue.....
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Hmm. Sounds like a good way to go. I've not tried this, but it sounds useful.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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