How to change oil in a rotary compressor?

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On Wed, 29 Jul 2009 06:13:58 -0400, The King

I have a few beore I leave so heres my parting thoughts on your defrost problem. I use a 6F differential on the control setting. So with a 35F box cut out air temp would be 32F and cut in temp would be 38F. So at a target avg of 35.. yeah, you might want a defrost clock.
I'd bump the temp up a half a degree or so to keep the air temps above 32F. That way you maintain a more consistant box temp which is good for the product and the consumer.
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The King wrote:

Since I'm not the worlds leading expert on refrigeration/HVAC, I can only comment on my own personal experience with the various equipment over the last four decades. I would have to research the subject to give you any sort of proper and precise explanation. All I can say is that every R22 walk-in cooler I've ever seen, has had a defrost system except for the homemade ones that didn't work until they were equipped with some sort of defrost system. Every factory built condensing unit for an R22 walk-in cooler including walk-in freezers has had some sort of defrost system. Passive for the coolers, active for the freezers. I'm always willing to learn new things so if you can tell me more and point me to the source, I have no problem being corrected. When it comes to education, my ego doesn't get in the way.
TDD
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On Wed, 29 Jul 2009 14:53:24 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Every

What do you mean when you say "passive for the coolers"?
I agree every ref system needs some sort of defrost. it could be either electric, hot gas, manual, or off cycle.
What you said was every r22 cooler needs a defrost clock. I don't see why it would. Most refers are designed to have a 2/3 run time. The other 1/3 is off. When it is off the space warms and any light accumulation of frost should melt off before the next start. About the only time I have seen or had to put a timer in is when the customer wants the coldest beer in town and wants the coolers to run 30-35F. At those temps there is not enough off time above freezing F to allow for a natural defrost and a defrost clock is needed.
Why is it an r 22 cooler needs a clock when a r 12 cooler didn't. Just askin..
The evap temps are the same for each and every ref used for medium temp work at a 10 delta. The refrigerants pressure/temp relationships change with the type of refrigerant and they all have different boiling points and properties. Some temps are cooler at x pressure and some are warmer. They each have a different capacity per pound circulated and all that jazz but those factors are why there are different ratings for compressor duty and the type of refrigerant used in them.
I hate to type and run but I have to pack the bike now and off to Sturgis. :)
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On Wed, 29 Jul 2009 19:41:10 -0400, The King

    Have fun parking next to 150,000 other bikes just like yours, you rugged individualist, you :-)
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On Wed, 29 Jul 2009 21:21:18 -0400, .p.jm.@see_my_sig_for_address.com wrote:

Its not as bad as it looks on TV. :)
I got back last night around midnight after leaving the Sioux Falls area at 5:30am. Ran in over eight hundred miles of pouring down rain and a cross wind that was unbelievable. All in all it was a good trip and we logged over 3200 miles.
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On Sat, 08 Aug 2009 09:48:05 -0400, The King

    Sounds like a big fun ride ! Not ..... :-)

    You missed the hail ? Darn :-)
    Was this Sturgis or an Iron Butt ride ???
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On Sat, 08 Aug 2009 11:10:53 -0400, .p.jm.@see_my_sig_for_address.com wrote: snipage

No, when I got home. lol
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The King wrote:

Careful out there, the cage drivers are out to get you. Passive defrost: Cut the flow of refrigerant, leave the evaporator fan/fans running. Ambient temp rises melting the frost buildup. Active defrost: Cut the flow of freon, turn off the evaporator fan/fans, turn on electric heaters or use a hot gas defrost cycle to melt the ice buildup. I've never had the R12 systems freeze up unless the temp was set too low or the evaporator air flow was impeded. R22 walk-in coolers always seem to freeze up without a timed defrost cycle. All those years ago when I was at college studying for my degree in rocket surgery, the classes never covered walk-in coolers so I can't give you a scientific explanation.
TDD
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Maybe the flash point (the temp at the TXV) is lower, for R-22, and so it tends to make a frozen spot, which spreads and covers the evap?
No proof. Just pulling ideas out of the sky.
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You can't do that! This is usenet!
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There are a number of refrigerants that are not on the "endangered species" list that would work just fine with mineral oil.
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Did'nt think of anything else than R407C before I started to empty it from oil since the compressor is designed for R22 and 407 is wery close ()and I can get 407 wery cheap...
/Lars S
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On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 11:07:31 -0700 (PDT), Lars S

    Stormy Mormy would put compressed air from his local service station in it, if it were free.
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.p.jm.@see_my_sig_for_address.com wrote:

That would work for a vortex system.

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On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 11:50:07 -0700 (PDT), Lars S

Wasn't sure what you meant by rotary so I looked it up. According to my research it's a screw pump. If that's the case then I have changed oil in a rotary compressors before.
Create pressure in the system then valve off any means for the pressure to bleed off once you shut it down. Find the appropriate outlet for the used oil and let the trapped are force it out. Alternatively provide an outside source of air pressure and do the same.
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On 27 Juli, 20:42, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Thanks, yes, the big rotarys are of screw type but this is a small hermetic rotary compressor (as used in many residential split AC's), no service valves etc for oil; the oil is never ment to be changed. (Picture
http://www.samsung.com/global/business/rotary/images/img_39frame.gif )
All ideas are welcome!
/Lars S
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On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 12:22:19 -0700 (PDT), Lars S

    Wrong.
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Who's wrong. Certainly not me. "A rotary compressor" is a type of screw pump.
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On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 18:19:19 -0400, "Old and Grunpy"

They are not veins. They are screws that are machined in a way that compresses the gas or liquid in a given direction.

Sorry. You are wrong. Vein pumps are Vane pumps. Vane pumps can be considered a rotary compressor, but when talking about air conditioner compressors the term" rotary compressor" is most likely a rotary screw compressor.
Hydraulic pumps can be any type of positive displacement pump. Usually a high pressure pump such as a piston, vane, gear or even a screw pump.

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On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 19:17:39 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

BTW pumps are not compressors. And Paul is right. Sorry.
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