Heil NTC6 Furnace with water in pressure switch tube

Gents (and ladies),
I have a 2000-built Heil NTC6 furnace with a new problem. Water is collecting in the rubber tube that connects the inducer blower to the pressure switch. The water won't allow the pressure switch to stay closed, so the burners are only lighting for 10-15 seconds at a time...thus the furnace cannot meet the thermostat setting...unless I unplug the rubber hose allowing the few drops of water in the tube to run out. Then all is well for a few days until the above repeats.
This all started when I had to replace the original inducer blower (bearing gone bad), and the new part is not *exactly* the original FASCO 7002-2633 blower, but instead an OEM 1013833 / Jakel J238-138-1393 model, which is listed as an appropriate replacement part.
Does anyone know if the new blower is creating the problem with condensation in the line? We've never had this problem before replacing the inducer blower, and I'm wondering if a FASCO A172 (exact replacement part) inducer blower isn't the solution? Any help is appreciated!
Thank you, Andy South Bend, IN
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On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 20:23:01 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Its not rocket science you know. Ever think of having someone that knows what they are doing come look at it? Bubba
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Was there any signs of water when you replaced the blower?

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James, there was no evidence of water in the blower when it came off. It almost seems like a condensation problem, but that's just a guess.
The blower was replaced by a service tech, and then I asked a different company to come out to diagnose the new problem (due to a lack of prompt service by company #1). The second tech discovered the water as the problem, but had no answer for it. Nice folks on this alt...
Thanks, Andy
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On Jan 22, 9:56 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I agree it sounds like a condensation problem. And that's bad because I think that is an 80% unit and it should not be condensing out any water. Condensing units are made for that and use stainless steel and pvc where they have water. 80% units do not and condensation can cause all sorts of problems with the unit as well as the flue. Basically on an 80% unit all the water should leave as vapor out the exhaust. I'd look for other signs of water in the unit as well as in the flue. Theoretically a different speed inducer could change the exhaust conditions and cause condensation problems. You probably should have got the original guys back out there. With any problem that happens shortly after some sort of service the first thing to suspect is what ever was just "fixed".
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(snip)
I'm not familiar with this appliance. However:
Is there a way to route the tube in such manner as no trap is formed? The first bend in the tube can be directed up higher than the supply tube, then routed to the switch?
Water vapor is a byproduct of combustion. If over time it condenses in the tube during <off> cycles, that in itself is not necessarily a showstopper, if the tube can be routed so that condensate during <off> cycles can drain back to the supply tube.
I could be wrong.
Tom Beckner
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