Disabled and HVAC

I was a professor of Mechanical Engineering many years ago. I have been disabled for a long time. I am in the process of building a home, and have come across a problem. I must have the temperature inside of the house, 24/7/365 at 67 degrees. I now live in TN and it gets very hot here, 95 is not uncommon. I was told by several HVAC companies that the new heat pumps with an air handler will work for my case. But from my old days of doing things by hand and slid rule, a heat pump cannot do this, they say it can.
Can some one please advise me on this problem. If you do answer me, please consider this, it concerns my life.
thanks Prof. Jake Trexel
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On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 20:49:19 GMT, "Jake Trexel"

Ok Jake. No one else asked so you've got my interest. You need 67 degrees 24/7/365???? What on earth medical condition is there that you need that? Secondly, if you do in fact need that exacting temp requirement I would certainly imagine you need humidity control. Lastly, whatever you get, it obviously needs to be properly sized but you'll need complete redundancy as in at least 2 complete systems. Next to lastly, you'll need a back up generator that will handle 100% capacity of your system. Personally, I think you are in way over your head and cost is going to be a major factor if you do indeed actually need those specific conditions. Bubba
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LOL bubba's a doctor now!!!
Pull up your pants bubbs, you fat ugly degenerate!
-Canadian Heat
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On 10 Apr 2007 03:05:55 GMT, DANgER (danger< snipped-for-privacy@heat.com) wrote:

I cant. You wont get your big lips off my dong. Let go you dog humper. Go find a goat. Bubba
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wrote:

<snip>
The necrophiliac's temperature of choice? <g>
-zero
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[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
wrote:

67F +-0F is impossible. Is humidity an issue as well? Is that actual temperature or "heat index"?
If given a rational tolerance, any traditional system as well as including heat pump can do the job. Humidity control may be a difficult problem if needed.
If it is a true critical medical issue, a "safe zone" with a redundant system and backup power seems equally vital.
gerry
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Professor,
First, I suggest you get an engineer certified in refrigeration or your never going to be satisfied with any answer without mathematical and scientific proof.
Secondly, keep a CLOSE tolerance on your building construction, use materials that do not allow infiltration, such as sprayed on foam verses crappy fiberglass, or consider foam panel construction. Control the infiltration with make up air, keeping a positive pressure on the home to prevent unwanted pollutants and humidity infiltration. You won't obtain what you desire using general construction methods and materials.
Third, I don't know what medical condition you have that require such extreme control, but you should ask your certified licensed engineer if commercial equipment isn't the best choice for you. Another choice is a two stage geothermal system, which will control costs and eliminate the low ambient operational problems. You may have to order Hot Gas Bypass on your geothermal to control heat reclaim during extreme humidity days. Yes, its available and used, just not that much for residential units. Being your a past professor I imagine your going to have a much bigger and better house than us stupid people on this newsgroup could afford! (TNC) So get ready to really dig deep to meet the construction requirements, NO HVAC system will work right if you use fiberglass crap and standard construction practices!
Personally, I wouldn't give you a quote without engineering prints specifically spelling out every detail, including duct size, placement of ducts, refrigerant sizing with exact placement of lines, pressure settings if HG is used, CFM to be done by certified balancing company, and a punch list to make sure everything is right before letting you enter the home.
BTW, I have done lab work with tolerances of + - 1 degree with humidity in the same bands. Never have I heard a hospital require such limits, and certainly never have I heard of an illness with such tolerances for a home. This is why I recommend you hire a licensed engineer in the HVAC field and get specific prints.
Rich
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Well Jake I am not in HVAC business like my friend Barry however we do work on extreme temperatures and humidity's but I think you are asking for more then you may think Yes you can have practically any condition with in reason but those condition can run in lots dow big bucks that is if this guys actually will gave you what you asking for. 67 Degrees +&- what is so critical? how about RH as stated at what %? you have being asked about RH. +&- what? how about safety limits (if so critical)? how about back up system? how about air cool or water cool? how about air filters? how about ultra violet light to reduce or cutout allergy growth? continuously RH in range above 50% can generate many problems My advice is do more research and have contractor sing guarantee to met you specs or needed requirements. Dido www.cas-environ.com

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