Cracked / Broken high preesure switch on RHEEM

I have a 12 SEER RHEEM that's about 10 years old. The rubber push button on the high pressure switch has dried up and fallen off, leaving it susceptible to debris, insects, moisture, etc..
It has tripped four or five times, and I had been able to reset it with a small awl. But this time, I think it is toast. It no longer resets, but I can see and hear the relay contact close when i put my awl into the reset switch opening.
There doesn't look to be any visible "switch" in there, perhaps it rusted out.
Its April in Texas, about 78 degrees right now. I have ran it before earlier in the year, after having to reset the switch. But it has not run at all in about two weeks.
My questions are: 1. Is it most likely the condition of the switch that is causing the problem? Or do I really have a high pressure situation?
2. The capillary line looks like it is soldered right inline with the system. No way I can replace just the switch itself?
3. What about bypassing the switch altogether with a jumper. The indoor thermostat will still cycle the compressor right?
4. What do you think a good price is to get the HPS replaced? I've seen online the neweset RHEEM part that replaces it. Old 47-21604-03, New 47-100326-01. $30.25. So to evacuate the system and put a new switch inline plus labor sounds expensive.
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If the refrigerant balance is correct, then theoreticaly that high pressure safety switch should never trip.

nope
Its not recommended to bypass *ANY* safety device.

Replacing that pressure switch goes like this..... Recover all of the refrigerant out of the entire system Remove the old HPS Install the new HPS (47-100326-01 is the correct part number and was the *original* OEM part on RAMB and RAMC units) Install a new filter/drier Vacuum the entire system to 400 microns Recharge the system and balance the charge with new refrigerant (depending on the size of the system will take anywhere from 5 to 15 lbs R-22)
$500 is about right up to about 3 tons, more $$$ for refrigerant required for larger systems.
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On 21 Apr 2007 12:55:18 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It could be either or...

Um, yes you can (sort of). It would be best be done by someone that knows what they are doing.

Yes and No. You can but you'll be losing a safety device. Not to bright in my mind.

$4,000 sounds good.
Leave the existing switch alone. The two wires to it will need to be cut (NOT jumpered.) Install an access T fitting with schraders (screw on) to the high pressure gauge port. Get a High pressure switch with the exact same pressure setting and screw it on to the T. Wire it to the two wires of the system that were cut. It is a permanent fix........especially since the unit is 10 yrs old. Keep in mind, if you have a clogged metering device, dirty condenser or bad motor, etc, this fix will not cure a thing. And thats all the secrets Im giving out for a year. Merry Christmas Bubba
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