Compressors

Dear Sir,
Can you tell me, how the rotary air compressor compressed the air. and also give the some basic information regardind compressors.
Thanks,
SHAFI
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_compressor
Have you ever used Google? Yahoo? Hotbot or the doxen or so other search engines on the web?
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Seems like a company like Ingersoll Rand would have that information.
http://www.airends.com/products.htm
Here is a web page for a company who repairs rotary air compressors.
However, this information is waaay off topic for a heating and AC group.
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simple: lektricity turns the motor, which spins the compressor, which does the squeezin' of the air it pulls in from outer space and pushes into a tank. It is often used to put the smoke into electrical parts that get let out when the part "burns up" . Parts don't really burn up, only the smoke escapes. Ingersol Rand has been building air squeezers for a very long time now, so yes, they are the experts if anybody is.
I remember using an old IR compressor (big, big trailer thing that was diesel powered, but you hand to start it with a gasoline pony engine that was started with an arm busting hand crank. It was so big it reminded me of a circus trailer. It was not funny though
ayup

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wrote:

Sure. Compression results when pumping occurs around a restricted or blocked (throttled) circuit.
Compression ratio is the ratio of absolute pressures on either side of the pump, and absolute pressure is referenced off of zero psia (absolute vacuum or void).
Compression ratio is determined by adiabatic pumping volume vs flow rate. In a standard air compressor, it would approach infinity until the motor overloaded or the tank exploded, so there is a cycling (cutout/cutin) switch. There is also and emergency release valve and sometimes a "soft plug" (often also found on CO2 bottles).
This is for non-condensing gases (such as dry air), water vapor and oil vapor notwithstanding. Partial pressures throw things off a little, and then we have to deal with Dalton's law. Also, compression adds heat, so we have to deal with Charle's law, unless the gas is intercooled (happens in the tank eventually, anyway).
In a refrigerant circuit, things are very different, as pressures (and therefore compression ratio) are determined by several conditions, and pressures occur at or near saturation (liquid/vapor line on P-h chart). Superheating, subcooling, losses and noncondensible impurities notwithstanding.
You will need to read some good books on pneumatics, hydraulics, mechanical compression, refrigeration, and thermodynamics.
Also, Google is your friend.
But also, there is a lot of misinformation both online and offline, so when you study and research, discernment is really your best friend.
P.S.:
And before anyone asks:
No, I don't know why I answered this.. I just felt like it. I woke up, fired up the newsreader, and saw an honest question (however open-ended).
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