Can't adjust the Pilot light in my Gas Stove? adj screw.

My pilot light flame has gotten too big, it does past the two sensors. I found the adjustment screw on the honeywell valve, but the flame does not respond to the adjustment. I tried unscrewing it all the way (using a very small flat screw driver) to see if the spring is stuck, but there is no spring. My stove is a Vermont casting stove about 6 years old. Any ideas? Also, curious what made the pilot light get bigger to begin with? thanks
here is a picture of the gas valve.
http://i716.photobucket.com/albums/ww163/zappp777/pilot.jpg pilot adjustment above the two wire leads.
valve model VS8420E http://tinyurl.com/2em4set
stove model: rdv40
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On 10/10/2010 7:45 AM, AA VVVV wrote:

Your gas pressure may be too high. I had a guy from our local gas company tell me that most of the regulators are set to 6-8 inches water column pressure. You will find some homes with a main regulator set to 2psi with a separate regulator on each appliance. You should find out what you gas supply pressure is. Most of the time, when the gas pressure is too high, the gas valve is designed to lock out. If you know what a manometer is and how to use it, you could find out for yourself but it may be best to ask your local gas company if they'll check it for you. I'm assuming you're on natural gas.
TDD
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What about the other two adjustment screws I see. Do they affect the pilot light or just the main flame? If pressure is the problem, why was the pilot size fine until now? I forgot to turn off the pilot light during the summer, is that bad for the pilot? I did have a small gas leak at the valve connection, so I tightened it, so it's fine now. Maybe the high pressure can cause a leak?
Also, what about main shut off valve out side the house. Could I open it only half way to reduce the pressure?
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Its pretty obvious that you don't know what your doing, and don't have the proper tools to do it..... Best to do like you were told.... call the gas company and let them do it. Home owners messing with gas appliances that they really don't know anything about, can have serious consequences.
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thanks your very much, you are sooooo helpful.
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Gee, I'm awfully sorry its not what you wanted to hear..... I hope your home owners and medical insurance is paid up.
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By the way..... I forgot to mention that the gas company will come out and check it for FREE.
now you can go fuck yourself.
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On 10/10/2010 1:23 PM, AA VVVV wrote:

Well, you got good advice and no one is trying to be arrogant or snooty. I hate to see ANYONE get hurt because they don't know what they're doing with something as dangerous as natural gas. If you have the large diameter gas lines, 3/4 inch minimum, you have a low pressure system where the pressure of the gas will feel like you are blowing on the back of your hand, you may not hear a leak like you would in a 2psi system. If you smell the mercaptan, you're in danger. The odorant was adopted many years ago because so many people had been hurt or killed because of fires and explosions due to gas leaks. Please, please, call your gas company or heating and air service company. Those folks will have the knowledge and proper test equipment to diagnose your problem. If you don't pester them too much, they let you watch and explain what they're doing.
TDD
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thanks your very much, you are sooooo helpful.
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I also wonder.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Sure looks like the "PILOT ADJ" to me.
As to the main gas valve, closing it half way won't affect your pilot. However, when your furnace or water heater tries to run, it may starve for gas. I'd leave the gas main valve wide open.
Maybe your gas company or a HVAC guy can check your gas pressure. See if the house regulator is delivering too much pressure.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 10/10/2010 7:45 AM, AA VVVV wrote:

Dang! I just had a thought, I wonder if the screw is actually a plug? You have to take the screw out to reach a needle valve inside the opening. I've never seen a Phillips head screw as a plug, it's usually an Allen socket plug.
TDD
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