Can Condensor pad be wood??

The quotes for my new heat pump include a base made of some kind of concrete or plastic. (kind of ugly material).
Can a heat pump base be made of a nice wood decking as long as the wood was rot resistant. I'd be glad to make a small sturdy wood base to avoid the normal pad in order to blend in with my home better.
Is it against code or a bad idea?
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You can make base of anything you want but it would be nice rubber and cork isolation pads for outside rubber alone would do fine From Dido

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Will it last 20 - 30 years sitting on the bare ground without rotting or being eaten by insects??
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How high are they talking about making this thing? Here (San Antonio Tx) the slabs have to be at least 3" above grade and the same size as the unit. I cannot imagine it being that unsightly, but you could put a wood border around it if you wanted. Even if for some reason you have to have the unit much higher than that, you could still attach lattice, or thin strips of wood to a concrete pad in whatever design you like. Larry
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condenser on the gravel
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building code in my area dictates either a concrete pad or an approved composite (plastic) pad specifically made for ac units. Also, the condensing unit must me mechanically secured to such pad for seismic restraint.
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Are you joking some one in part of country were you live needs head examination. Dido
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wrote:

The way they do it is a little messed up IMHO.... but the "seismic restraint" is serious and for real in earthquake country.
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wrote:

Where is the thing gonna go? Just fall off the pad?
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"Oscar_Lives" wrote:

suppose its mounted on the roof of a 2 story bldg....
upright water heaters also require seismic restraint
hanging fancoils and furnaces require sesimic restraint.
sheet metal duct systems hanging lower than 12" from structural framing requires seismic restraint, as do all light fixtures and grills in t-bar ceilings. hell even the t-bar ceiling grid requires seismic restraint, and the inspectors are very anal about all aspects of seismic restraint.
just because we dont feel all of them, does not mean they arent occurring on a very regular basis.
http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/shake/ca /
and
http://www.data.scec.org/recenteqs.html
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Fall off the pad onto the roof?

OK-- I kind of see this one-- especially for gas heaters.

Fall over?

WTF? You mean you don't attach them to the building otherwise?

Women fake orgasims. So what? As long as I get mine...

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I'd check with the local codes department. Most likely pressure treated or marine grade wood should last long enough.
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Christopher A. Young
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Marine grade simply means that the wood contains no voids. Pressure treated would be the way to go if local code permits.
Stormin Mormon wrote:

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You left out Navy, Coast Guard, Army and Air force grade ;o)

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Those guys look good in uniform. But not tough enough to be laying on the ground with a condensor on your chest for 10 to 15 years.
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Christopher A. Young
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Shit, did I give you credit for having any wisdom because of your sig? I take it back; you are a true asshole idiot, in my opinion. Damn stupid fuck.

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Thanks. I never knew that. Figured it meant that the wood could be under water all the time.
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Nope. Pressure treated is often not preferred in marine applications because the pressure treating reduces it's ability to get good paint adhesion.
Marine grade commonly is applied to plywood and it means that when the plywood is manufactured any knots are removed and voids filled on every ply. On regular plywood this is only done on the finish, aka surface, ply.
In many situations wood underwater is less likely to rot. That's why they still excavate wooden ships that are hundreds of years old.
Stormin Mormon wrote:

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It can be wood as long as it's level and pressure treated. I'd go with concrete and paint it personally.

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