bulges and "hot spots" inside 20 year old furnace...do I really need new one?

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wrote:

The
find
as "hot

bulges
developing
exchanger....can a

what he

is a

"view
This
furnace
burners
of
outside.
where is it

based on

about
or is it

don't
could
brand that

both the

Carrier
as long

at
is
it is

an
It may be the heaviest, but it's not like its a 1/4 inch thick.
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- It may be the heaviest, but it's not like its a 1/4 inch thick
Dunno...it was a 1950-ish Perfection gas fired forced air. From exterior of the heat exchanger, it certainly appeared and felt, like the unit was pretty thick.
In an earlier post, someone said (about the 20 YO Carrier) "The burner tubes are inside the heat exchanger". On my perfection, the burner was below the heat exchanger in it's own compartment. The burner was, I don't know, about a 9" x 9" plate with over a hundred (?) flames.
The heat exchanger pictured towards the bottom of this site looks like an absolute wimp compared to the rough surfaced, solid looking heat exchanger in my old furnace.
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wrote in message

...
Sounds like a manufacturers conversion from oil to gas.

Sounds Like an oil to gas conversion. Midco burners did quite well through to 60's-70's. :-)
In the early 60's, there were quite a few companies that designed their own conversion burner (or fuel burner of choice) as they we're sitting on a cargo loads of oil furnace chambers that were not moving anytime soon. As Natural-Gas lines were being run like mad through the big cities, Gas furnace design was changing from gravity units w/ add-on blowers, to the typical 80%'ers of the 1960's-80's.
Mind you, back then there were 1,000 times (WAG) the number of furnace and boiler manufacturers in the US. Many were very popular/well known but only encompassing a very small region of the country.
Some of these are still running today, due to the lack of the Planned-Obsolescence concept, and the focus was mostly "Ours is better/stronger/faster than yours".
-zero
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If it was a conversion, it was certainly done by the manufacturer, as you stated. The manual included instructions for the installed gas valve and side mounted blower.
The original gas valve had a flip-up tab so you could manually operate the gas valve during a power outage. The manual listed the duty cycle for operating the unit without a blower. I doubt the comparatively wimpy heat exchangers of today's furnaces could handle running without a blower.
Wouldn't you know that early one winter the gas valve started acting up, so I placed a service a call. They had to replace the gas valve, and "No, you can't have one that can be operated manually. They're illegal now." So what happens during March of same winter? A major ice storm in upstate NY. We were without power - and now without heat due to the "upgraded" gas valve - for 5 days.
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wrote:

find
"hot
bulges
"view
This
furnace
burners
it
on
it
could
that
the
Carrier
long
Heat exchangers are not known to crack?????
I think you're smoking crack!!!!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

It is possible. The key item is did he do a CO test? The risk in a cracked condenser is flue gas in the warm air stream which is a serious potentially fatal problem. While not as sensitive as a real instrument, a CO monitor could spot a serious problem.
Goodman is one of the lower initial cost units but seems recently (last couple of years from anecdotal evidence) to have upped their warranty periods. What the actual failure rates are for their gas furnace units I don't know but the last CR ratings for A/C units had them at the complete bottom and separated from the rest of the pack by a significant margin. I'd do a little investigative digging before jumping in, particularly if there is an A/C unit involved as well as the furnace.
--
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CR is a joke for rating HVAC equipment.
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bulges
Bulges, hum... a new sales tactic?

furnace
Yes
it
The burner tubes are inside the heat exchanger.

On a 20 year old furnace? No way, get out of here!

That's nice.

it
The question as to when to replace would be economics. Where do you live?

And probably present at the time of manufacturing. Try getting someone that's competent in HVAC.

that
the
Carrier
long
Any brand will last *if* properly sized, installed and set-up to run with-in the manufacture's specifications.
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Ok, so it sounds like your telling me that they're trying to BS me about the idea that bulges or curves in the metal are a sign that it is close to the point of cracking. What he showed me doesn't strike me as appearing to be present by design though.
Anyway, it sounds like I need to be getting a 2nd opinion as to whether the bulges or curves in the metal really mean that the metal is about to crack. Is there anyone you recommend in Northern NJ that knows what they are doing?
Thanks,
J

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This technician is probably right. You should start planning for a replacement furnace fairly soon. Yes, the existing furnace may last a while longer. But it may fail as soon as the really cold weather sets in and then you'll probably have a very hard time finding anyone to work on it unless you're willing to pay a premium price.
But you'd also be crazy to give the job to the first guy that came along. It's time to get recommendations and prices from several firms and think through exactly what kind of system you're going to want.
--
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Hi, Have a second opinion and if I were you, I'd plan for a replacement furnace. Sounds like you are trying to get last drop out of 20 year old inefficient furnace on today's standard. Remember Murphy's law. Things like that will fail on coldest day when techs are busiest. You can't even save some money then being in a big rush.
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Do bulges or curves in the metal of the heat exchanger mean it is about to crack or not? Yes or no?
J.
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Maybe you should take this over to alt.answers.magic8ball.
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No
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On Fri, 05 Oct 2007 16:06:28 GMT, " snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net"

Usually this is a sympton of your wife about ready to scream out another mans name during sex. Then the house blows up. Bubba
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