Braze or solder copper refrigerant lines to fittings

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Man, You're quoting regs from 10 years ago ! You guys sure have some strange regulations down there.... Also, where would the acidity be coming from if you are using a non-Acid flux ? The chemical properties of 95% tin and 5% Zinc SOLDER is 'completely' different than the zinc coating say,.. on the inside/ outside of a pipe ! Companies here have been installing 60 gallon water tanks (1000's of them yearly) the same way with no issues. I can't understand why anyone would use "Copper Phos" (is that what you meant ?) or any stick for that matter on a simple copper to copper connection, and especially a tiny 1/8th connector in a refrigeration scenario.
The only reaon anyone wouldn't use the "Far less expensive 95/5" is because they don't have the skills to keep the pipe and connectors at a constant temperature which is far LOWER than stick or silphos. The application in question just does NOT warrant Stick (silver bearing solder maybe...) but Copper PHosphate and High temp stick ?...... Overkill.
Cheers,
/FC....
where you been. Did you wag school when they were teaching how to braze refrig lines. Just read the install manual from any manufacturer
e.g Daikin
CAUTION TO BE TAKEN WHEN BRAZING REFRIGERANT PIPING
.Do not use flux when brazing refrigerant piping. Therefore, use the phosphor copper brazing filler metal
(BCuP-2: JIS Z 3264/B-Cu93P-710/795: ISO 3677) which does not require flux..
(Flux has extremely harmful influence on refrigerant piping systems. For instance, if the chlorine based flux is
used, it will cause pipe corrosion or, in particular, if the flux contains fluorine, it will damage the refrigerant oil.)
 Before brazing local refrigerant piping, nitrogen gas shall be blown through the piping to expel air from the
piping.
If you brazing is done without nitrogen gas blowing, a large amount of oxide film develops inside the piping,
and could cause system malfunction.
 When brazing the refrigerant piping, only begin brazing after having carried out nitrogen substitution or
while inserting nitrogen into the refrigerant piping. Once this is done, connect the indoor unit with a flared
or a flanged connection.
 Nitrogen should be set to 0.02 MPa with a pressure-reducing valve if brazing while inserting nitrogen into
the piping.
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Man, You're quoting regs from 10 years ago ! You guys sure have some strange regulations down there.... Also, where would the acidity be coming from if you are using a non-Acid flux ? The chemical properties of 95% tin and 5% Zinc SOLDER is 'completely' different than the zinc coating say,.. on the inside/ outside of a pipe ! Companies here have been installing 60 gallon water tanks (1000's of them yearly) the same way with no issues. I can't understand why anyone would use "Copper Phos" (is that what you meant ?) or any stick for that matter on a simple copper to copper connection, and especially a tiny 1/8th connector in a refrigeration scenario.
The only reaon anyone wouldn't use the "Far less expensive 95/5" is because they don't have the skills to keep the pipe and connectors at a constant temperature which is far LOWER than stick or silphos. The application in question just does NOT warrant Stick (silver bearing solder maybe...) but Copper PHosphate and High temp stick ?...... Overkill.
Cheers,
/FC....
It has *nothing* to do with "regs", it has to do with manufacturers instructions and good engineering practices. BTW... the customer pays for *EVERYTHING*
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Big difference. A refrigerant system has a tiny orifice to meter the refrigerant. A 60 gal water tank uses 1/2 or 3/4 copper water pipe.
--
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Man, You're quoting regs from 10 years ago ! You guys sure have some strange regulations down there.... Also, where would the acidity be coming from if you are using a non-Acid flux ? The chemical properties of 95% tin and 5% Zinc SOLDER is 'completely' different than the zinc coating say,.. on the inside/ outside of a pipe ! Companies here have been installing 60 gallon water tanks (1000's of them yearly) the same way with no issues. I can't understand why anyone would use "Copper Phos" (is that what you meant ?) or any stick for that matter on a simple copper to copper connection, and especially a tiny 1/8th connector in a refrigeration scenario.
The only reaon anyone wouldn't use the "Far less expensive 95/5" is because they don't have the skills to keep the pipe and connectors at a constant temperature which is far LOWER than stick or silphos. The application in question just does NOT warrant Stick (silver bearing solder maybe...) but Copper PHosphate and High temp stick ?...... Overkill.
Cheers,
/FC....
Yeah, following manufacture's installation instructions is "Overkill". <rolleyes>
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KJPRO wrote:

It is really irritating to have units that were brazed to code with 15-Silver phos 20 to 30 years ago and not one damned call to top them off. Christ, a Guy could starve to death doing it right. I wonder if maybe we could borrow a few $thousand from the guys that get call back after call back due to shitty work practices. Next, some hack will pop up and try to sell us on superglue, because you can save on using nitrogen.

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What's nitrogen for??? :-) Stormy is now searching Nitrogen and HVAC...
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Next thing you know, he'll be looking for "vacuum pump"
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He probably pulls a hose from the Pinto... aint that good enough?
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om...
Cheeeerist....,
I could put together copper pipe better than most of you 'loudmouth's with a freaking 100 watt soldering iron.....
heh,heh....
/FC...
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You noticed? The louder the protest, the less comptetence of the writer.
--
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pot kettle black
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Cheeeerist....,
I could put together copper pipe better than most of you 'loudmouth's with a freaking 100 watt soldering iron.....
heh,heh....
/FC...
Knock yourself out sport....
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Have any of you out there try to use StayBright????

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Staybright is not authorized for use by *most* manufacturers

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Ditto
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Yes, been using Sta Brite 8 (I think it's spelled) for several years. Works fine on new copper. But old copper works better with stick braze.
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I think you may need a double dose of STAY /BRITE on a daily basis for several more years!
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On Wed, 3 Sep 2008 12:23:20 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Spoken words of a complete hack. Bubba
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Gee, with all the money I save, I could get the slow leak fixed on my Pinto's back tire. Thanks! You're a real friend.
Sarcasm mode off.
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No reputable HVAC tech will use soft solder on refrigerant lines. Too many fatigue and leak issues.
Jman wrote:

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