ac lines in attic not insulated ?


This is in Arizona. The other day I was in my attic to lay some cat5 and noticed the ac lines in the attic running from the outside unit to the indoor part do not have any insulation on it. The line outside form the outside unit to the wall of the house do have insulation around it. The attic gets quite toasty and I'd think it would be a good idea to insulate them ? They are very easy to access. What do you think ?
Also, the lines are hanging from one end to the other for quite a bit of distance and not supported. While I Was up there one of the units kicked in and I noticed the line moving a little bit when the unit started.(then stopped moving, so only moved caused by the start) Probably not good either ? What do I use to hang it more secure ? The roof is a wood frame roof with tile on top. Well, Hope you hvac guru's can give me some advice,
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RT wrote:

Sure.. Helps prevent flash gas.

A wide band pipe plastic pipe strap will work just fine every 4 feet. Don't bind it too tight. It needs expansion and contraction room.
If you screw it up, contact Paul and he will straighten you out. :-p
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Sounds like the lowest bidder won. Bubba
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Definitely a good idea to insulate the lines. Where I am (western NYS) they sell foam wrap at the hardware stores. As to securing the lines, after the tubing is foam wrapped, it's not likely to rub on anything and wear through. So, strapping it down is less important, then.
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Might as well leave 50 feet freehang... LOL
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KJPRO wrote:

Stormy must think that Code book is for sitting on to raise him up to drivers height in that Pinto.

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Stormy needs to give us his address so we can send him a rock to bash his own head in. Rocks are expensive, but I'd be willing to spend the 15 cents a pound plus shipping for a good size rock. What color would you like Stormy? I'll paint it for you. Your lame web site has no address that I was able to see.
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If the OP was located about anywhere else other than where he is (Az) he would probably have discovered the lines were not insulated when he was trying to figure out the cause of the very long skinny black stain on his ceiling. Preventing condensation and the resulting damage is at least as important a reason for insulating the suction line as efficiency and protection from damage to the lines. We have seen a number of damaged ceilings where critters have gotten in attics and torn off the insulation. Larry
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wrote:

Only the suction side gests insulated (the large line, low pressure side). The smaller line (high pressure side) will be operating at as high as the attic temperature. It will be much higher temperature than the outside ambient. Loosing heat from the high pressure side is a good thing. Gaining heat on the low pressure side is bad. Insulated it with more then the industry requires since the delta T in the attic is high and energy costs are only to head in an upward trend.
Andy Home Performance XXXX
You've never heard of a reason to insulate a LL??? I removed part of your title... as it didn't fit you.
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On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 10:20:13 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Stormy, You are the dumbest baboon Ive have ever seen. Using R-22 (since I know you havent touched R-410a) on a 90 degree day around here, it is very common to see a normal head pressure of 250 psi. R-22 sitting in a bottle at 90 degrees will show you a pressure of 168.4 psi. Isnt 250 psi and 168.4 psi quite different? Now I know this will make your head spin but the system is not dirty and it is operating properly. Now, you wanna go over that assinine statement you made above and explain how retarded you are............."boy"? You are dumber than a box of rocks. Bubba
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Rock or Book. Pick one and please follow through. Thank You.
-zero
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