A/C working properly? Cost -> lower temp?

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wrote:

not
apartment
wrong
Again, did you miss the $320 electric bill.
Clueless I tell you, just pure stupidity!
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It could be that a neigbhor is using her electricity. There was a case on tv like that just last week. And oh yeah, there was a follow-up in this newsgroup just last week where another tenant was was using the poster's electricity, and had been for months, since he moved in.
So she could have two separate problems, the bill and the lack of cooling.
But I believe the AC is broken and it alone is using the electricity, and still we need to know details. She''s the one who wanted to prepare before the repairman came. This is not a case of "it's too difficult for you. Why investigate? Call the repairman." The repairman is coming but she wanted to be prepared for him.
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wrote:

the
temp
know
opinion,
wasn't,
and
if
Yeah, whatever, like that happens everyday.
You're still a clueless twit!
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carie snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

Indeed. This by itself isn't much information. I'm no expert, but I know that A/C units need to be properly sized for the load. (If a unit is oversized, bad things happen like either excessively short cycle times or uncomfortable temperature swings, and maybe problems with humidity regulation.) What this means is that on the hottest few days of the year, the A/C *should* run a lot. If I understand correctly, it is perfectly reasonable behavior for your A/C unit to run for "hours" on the hottest few days of the year.
Now, combine that with the fact that the large parts of the Western US have been experiencing a heat wave. There may be record high temperatures where you live. Or maybe not; you might not live in one of those areas that is experiencing record highs. We don't have that information.
The $320 electric bill is a sign, but it's not really proof of anything. There was a guy who posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living only a few weeks ago whose electric bill at a small office suite was through the roof, even though he was only there a few days a week and turned everything off when he left. Turned out a neighboring office suite had been accidentally wired through his meter!
So, I don't think it's unreasonable to ask you to quantify "hours". (On the other hand, the flame fest that this thread has turned into is unreasonable.)
- Logan
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wrote:

the $320 light bill is from LAST MONTH, and has nothing to do with the current heat wave. The OP needs to either A) be climbing the landlords ass tot get it fixed, or B) pony up the cash and hire a pro to fix it.

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wrote:

apartment
Your post means nothing, did you miss her $320 electric bill.
What that means, is that the unit is running excessively!!!!!
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carie snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

Hmm. 12:00PM implies twelve hours past midday (p.m. = "post meridian" = past midday). That would be midnight. From there to 7:46PM means the ac has been on for almost twenty hours.
Of course one could also say 12:00AM (a.m. = "ante meridian" = before midday) which would also be midnight.
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Sorry, 12:00PM is noon. Have a High School diploma?? Is English your native language??
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On Jul 7, 8:24 am, snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

I know how to tell time I wasn't sure YOU did based on the problem solving skills you have displayed thus far
noon or midnight eliminates any possible confusion as does "seven hours" vs "hours" :)
the more humble & helpful (clearly posed questions) you appear the more likely you'll get help
I know you're frustrated having a problem that you don't have the skills or resources to address but pissing off people who could possibly help you isn't a good idead.
btw
my A/C works fine (& I know how they work) I don't have to ask for help from a bunch of abuse a$$'s in alt.hvac & I don't live in an 800 sq ft apt at the mercy of some cheap landlord
stop whining & get a window unit.......you've already pissed away more than the cost of a unit on electricity
have a nice day :)
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carie snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

I have a high school (and college) diploma. Yet, I don't think everything I heard in high school (or college) is automatically true. In particular, 2000 wasn't the first year of the new millenium, and 12:00 PM is not noon.
Here's an explanation of why:
http://tf.nist.gov/timefreq/general/misc.htm#Anchor-57026
Note that this comes from NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, which is the US federal government agency responsible for standardizing measurements. These are the people who operate NIST-F1, the atomic clock which is the primary reference for timekeeping in the United States, and one of the primary references worldwide.
- Logan
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snipped-for-privacy@austin.rr.com says...

Well, we can't all be 100% correct. You're batting .500, which isn't bad in some shapes.

Sillyness.
^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 1. What part of government is "responsible" for anything? 2. You _are_ talking about the US federal government. 3. Oxymoronic.

4. Pedantic.
--
Keith


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I posted a detailed reply to the 12:00 thing elsewhere is this thread.
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wrote:

meridian" = past

has been

everything
particular,
noon.
timekeeping
And the simple minded people STILL can't comprehend it. LOL
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wrote:

Old news.... who really gives a rats ass anyway. It has absolutely nothing to do with the price of tea in China.
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I posted a detailed reply to the 12:00 thing elsewhere is this thread.
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2007 14:57:04 -0500, Logan Shaw

This is so on-point, I think it deserves to be quoted. Also, I don't think there can be copyright issues with government websites info, all of which should be in the public domain"
Are noon and midnight 12 a.m. or 12 p.m.?
This is a tricky question. The answer is that the terms 12 a.m. and 12 p.m. are wrong and should not be used.
To illustrate this, consider that "a.m" and "p.m." are abbreviations for "ante meridiem" and "post meridiem." They mean "before noon" and "after noon," respectively. Noon is neither before or after noon; it is simply noon. Therefore, neither the "a.m." nor "p.m." designation is correct. On the other hand, midnight is both 12 hours before noon and 12 hours after noon. Therefore, either 12 a.m. or 12 p.m. could work as a designation for midnight, but both would be ambiguous as to the date intended.
When a specific date is important, and when we can use a 24-hour clock, we prefer to designate that moment not as 1200 midnight, but rather as 0000 if we are referring to the beginning of a given day (or date), or 2400 if we are designating the end of a given day (or date).
To be certain of avoiding ambiguity (while still using a 12-hour clock), specify an event as beginning at 1201 a.m. or ending at 1159 p.m., for example; this method is used by the railroads and airlines for schedules, and is often found on legal papers such as contracts and insurance policies.
===> I've heard this before.
If one is referring not to a specific date, but rather to several days, or days in general, use the terms noon and midnight instead of 12 a.m. and 12 p.m. For example, a bank might be open on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Or a grocery store might be open daily until midnight. The terms "12 noon" and "12 midnight" are also correct, though redundant.
====> On July 3, I was a at a supermarket that had a temporary sign, and someone had written "Open July 4, 7AM to 12AM, and then it had a dark P written over the second A.

I liked it better when it was the National Bureau of Standards. They keep changing names and confusing me. (I'm just going to call the INS "la Migra" so I don't have to worry when it changes names.)

I'll tell you how I remmeber this, and how I think it arose. The moment of noon is neither before noon or after noon, but the 59.999999999...... seconds after that are after noon, and yet still part of the minute that is 12:00. (and part of the second that is 12:00:00.) So even though all but the tiniest bit of the minute is not noon, most of 12:00 noon is PM.

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mm wrote:

Panda eats, shoots and leaves.
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wrote:

I think I meant to say a dark A written over the P. :(

Indeed.
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mm wrote:

I'll have to admit that makes a lot of sense. The time exactly one minute after noon is 12:01PM. If noon has to be called either 12:00PM or 12:00AM, then out of the two, 12:00PM is the much more logical choice since it would be wacky for 12:00AM to be followed immediately by 12:01PM.
However, it is still not very good terminology since (a) the literal meaning of "12:00AM" is nonsensical and (b) there is already a perfectly good word ("noon") to describe the concept. On the other other hand, it is convenient for digital clocks to be able to read "12:00PM" instead of "noon", which is a good argument for defining 12:00PM to be noon. On the other other other hand, there are various authorities whose opinions should matter, and they don't seem to all agree on any one thing.
- Logan
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2007 17:21:11 -0500, Logan Shaw

Yeah, you're right there. I'm very literal myself, and this sort of thing usually matters a lot to me. I think maybe this time I came at it already humbled and ready to give in.
But that is what makes it difficult to learn the convention.

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