13 SEER Splits not cooling!??!

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Stormin Mormon wrote:
I'm a duck. But, being a duck isn't all it's quacked up to be.
============= Just don't say that out in some field around Dick Cheney.
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Yeah, Dick Cheney is a real blast.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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On 8 Aug 2006 18:40:20 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sounds like somebody's company needs a little training.

I guess you and your buddies will have to learn another charging method other than .........."beer can cold".
What! Units being sensitive to high return temps, high outdoor temps and refrigerant charges? Simply unheard of. Makes no sense at all.

brick wall. Wanna try that with a Yugo?

Better
Bubba
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ok, I'll take your word for it

There's your problem... incorrect installation

You been down here lately?? I been following behind you and recovering all that excess refrigerant... Post your address so I know where to send the bill for recycling and hazardous waste disposal..... go back to school so you can learn how its supposed to be done.

When they are correctly sized, and properly installed, they are much more efficient and work a lot better than 10 SEER.

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Yeah, and years ago the old industrial machinery could be troubleshot with a cheapo Radio Shack multi meter. Nowadays you need a CAN bus analyzer and harmonic analyzers to troubleshoot because the new machinery is subject to electrical noise and interference. Times have changed. You have to be more educated and do a much more professional job. Self pride is #1. And, education is different than brilliance. Having both is best. ( I'm not really a DIMwit, just very humble)
You can't get away with sloppy work and have good results. (not that you ever could).
Your message is very troubling; I hope you are an office worker and not involved in doing any actual HVAC work in your company.
Bob

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We have recently had to spend about $13,000 per truck to outfit out guys with retrofritzulator wide spectrum analyzers. Seems that a mistuned condensing unit throws a heck of a harmonic misconvergence, and you really need precise equipment to be able to tune the valves. I don't think those CAN bus analyzers work on some of the new equipment. Course, they are showing up on Ebay, now that the retrofritzulator technology is going digital. The old analog ones can be really great quality. Just have to be more gentle, the swing meters damage easily.
On the other hand, Dimwit and I could be having some fun with you.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Per truck? How about your ragged out old Pinto?

Like we do with you? Oh wait, that's not fun, we're serious.
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Ya see, Stormy, even though you are trying to have fun, you sound like a complete moron to me too now. CAN bus analyzers and instruments to measure harmonic distortion in power lines are not fairy tale words. They are real to my industry. you just go ahead with your....... are you from a cabbage patch or an escapee from the looney toon barn? You're not a real person are you?
Oh yeah: hee hee
bob

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DIMwit wrote:

Thanks for beating me to the reply, Bob (-;.
I would be willing to bet the various bus analyzers I use (whether that be CAN, MODbus, LON, AB DH+, or even Ethernet/Ethernet radio) probably cost more than poor Stormy's car.
Add in a couple of good spectrum analyzers and the whole kit-n-kaboodle probably costs more than his house.
Bob, I'd be interested in you use of CAN if you're utilizing it in HVAC. The whole world seems to going to Ethernet these days...
Jake
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Jake posted for all of us... I don't top post - see either inline or at bottom.

--
Tekkie

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Tekkie wrote:

But it goes so damn fast I can't get it open.
Jake
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Jake,
I am not in HVAC at all; I just find this a very interesting group and even through all the bickering, I try to pick up some information for my brain to absorb, plus lots of humor. My company's products are built for the graphic arts industry. We manufacture, sell, install, and service printing presses and bookbinding equipment. Our products start around 350K and most installations run about 3 to 5 million dollars. The high end equipment has many frequency inverter drives that are controlled by the multiple PLC's throughout the system(s) most of the bus we use is CAN, but we are also using Ethernet on our mid-range machinery to link the master PLC to an Ethernet hub, and from there on to link various modules of the machines. My company is based in Switzerland, and is the largest company in the world (so I hear) that produces the full range of equipment as we do. We use all European components, like B&R PLC's, and Lenze motor drives. Some machines have used (low end machines) Mitsubishi drives and Omron PLC's
I was a field service tech on the road for about 17 years, traveling all the time doing installs and service in all but 3 states (Oregon Washington, and Alaska), but since 1997, I have been doing telephone tech support for our customers and our service techs. I actually love what I do, but it is very stressful at times. I am quite experienced, but the technology just seems to get an awful lot to keep up with. I am 63 now, not the best anymore, but I get lots of respect from my peers for some reason. I broke my ass all those years and..ah, never mind, you know what I mean.
Even though HVAC is not rocket science, there is a lot of physics to know, and taking pride in doing a good job is super important in any field. HVAC is a good combination of mechanical and electrical skills.
I have lots of respect for the people in the HVAC trade that know their stuff and care to do a good job. Breaking your ass and working long hours can make the nicest guy seem like an asshole when stupid questions are asked of him. I get paid to help people fix stuff themselves over the phone. We give free tech support to our customers. Some customers have great maintenance electricians that I can easily help, and others, well, I have to first teach them how to use and read a meter if they can find one. "Sir, what is the problem with your machine?" "hey, if I knew, I wouldn't be calling you".
sorry for this long winded message
Bob

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"DIMwit" wrote:

[snip rest of interesting post]
You would have made a good BAS (Building Automation Systems) tech.
When I started, BAS's were built on mini computers and had separate Winchester hard drives the size of grocery carts. Floppy disks were 12-inch; a memory card was the half the size of a modern pc mother board and held a whopping 8 K of RAM.
The valve and damper actuators were all still pneumatic; there were about 20 union pipefitters working as pneumatic controls installers at the Honeywell branch when I hired on as a tech in 1982. DDC appeared about then. By the time I left in 1990, there were only two pipefitters left.
Those were the days...
--
Dan

"The future has actually been here for a while, it\'s just not readily
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I actually go back to 1962 when I worked for Burroughs in NYC as a field Engineer. Memory back then was toroidal donut windings core memory. So long ago, barely a memory.
Bob

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Dan Luke wrote When I started, BAS's were built on mini computers and had separate Winchester hard drives the size of grocery carts.
============ Today's very OT trivia question: Why were they called "Winchester Drives"?
I'm guessing that Paul will get this one without Googling.
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30 Mb/30Mb hard drives
Bob

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DIMwit wrote: 30 Mb/30Mb hard drives.
=============== Yep. Winchester 30-30.
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Whoops! Thought you were funning.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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You know Stormy,
there's something about you that makes me feel bad each time I say something about you.
You must be a nice guy, but I think sometimes you'd be better off to engage your brain before you put your mouth into gear.
You have some kind of quality that makes you sound like the old definition of a geek: from a definition web site: "Originally, a `geek' was a carnival performer who bit the heads off chickens. Before about 1990 usage of this term was rather negative." As I said once before, you wear your own "kick me" sign.
Man, I feel even worse now. Corona Extra, please........oh, OK, Dos Equis XX will do fine gimme three. that margarita was bad shit
Bob

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