Yellow jackets in my garden

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Our adventures in Oregon gardening continues. Within the last week an infestation of jellow jackets has developed in my garden, particularly in the area where there are rows of turnips and mustard close together. I've watched for a while, and there does not appear to be a nest nearby, they just seem to like the area. There are so many I'm afraid to work in that area while they are there. What to do?
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PS - I hung out a couple of traps (Rescue! Yellowjacket trap) but they are happily ignoring the traps :(
"Matthew Reed" <nospam at zootal dot com nospam> wrote in message

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"Matthew Reed" <nospam at zootal dot com nospam> wrote in message

try a yellowjacket trap - basically a bottle partially filled with colored sugar water (I don't know if a one-way top that they sell at garden stores is required)- yellowjackets go in, can't fly back out, drown.
(If you have a compost pile nearby, make sure the green is always on top of the house stuff - garbage attracts yellowjackets. )

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"Matthew Reed" <nospam at zootal dot com nospam> wrote:

Those yellow jackets are just trying to clean your garden. Here they are no problem until a dry August occurs then they search for water. They like sugar water aka soda and have been known to enter soda cans. They like to spare with my hummers so I provide a yellow trap on occasion too. Hummers are primary here.
I once weeded a jacket nest and was stung many times. If you see a hole about the size of a US quarter and yellow jackets come and go mark it and give ground. If possible but take it out if kids and others may stumble on it.
Bill
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Do they bother you when you working in the garden? I'm afraid to pull a turnip for fear of there being a bee on it that does not take kindly to my pulling it's food source out :)
We get some hornets here, but not very many and they are not very agressive (unless you disturb their nest). But yellow jackets are *everywhere*.
I'm curious that they are ignoring the trap I put out. It came with some "attractant", but I'm thinking they are not interested in that, they want food, so maybe I need to put some meat or fruit in the trap?
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"Matthew Reed" <nospam at zootal dot com nospam> wrote in message

Matthew, bees do not eat turnips. When you see bees around the garden, their main interest is the flowers. To them, you're like a maintenance person changing fluorescent bulbs in a busy office, with your ladder getting in everyone's way. It's their office.
I've got a butterfly bush, which (obviously) attracts butterflies, but also bees, some of which seem to be on steroids. They're huge. But, I give them as much space as I would a person operating a miter saw, and I haven't been bothered. They also hang out in the large flowers of eggplants, melons, zucchini and other stuff. They may fly out & take a look at you, but you're more likely to cut yourself on a piece of glass hiding in the soil, then be bothered by them.
I suggest you grab a good book, set up a chair right alongside the garden, and spend a few hours near them, watching what they do. I doubt they'll even notice you.
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When I said "bee", I meant the yellow jackets. We have many "bees" around here, and they are our friends. They don't bother us, we don't bother them. Yellow jackets are another story. My sister-in-law is deathly allergic to their stings, I'm not to crazy about them either, and I would happily kill every one of them :P
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We had yellow jackets in the yard when the kids were small. Their nest was underground about 8' from the house. I found it while mowing. As I mowed I thought about the nest the kids and decided that I had to do something. Gas. I dumped about a quart into the hole. Continued to mow continued to thing about the nest and the little kids.
Second bright idea. I stopped the mower went into the garage and got a news paper fashioned it into a long fuse and lighted it. I then went to the nest and touched the fuse to the hole. Everyone watched in amazement as flames shot out of several holes around the yard.
While it got rid of the yellow jackets, and no one was hurt. I have often thought about the insurance claim if one of the holes had came out closer to the house or there had been something more flammable near one of the holes. Probably was not the best idea on retrospect
Matthew Reed wrote:

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LOL I see a picture of a small mushroom cloud rising from the middle of your yard :-). You were lucky the gas didn't make them mad enough to come out and defend their nest. I can handle nests - but the nests aren't on my property, they just like to forage in my garden for food. And at any given time, there are maybe 10-15 in the garden. I'm guessing either a large nest(s), or a lot small ones not far away.
And those worthless "traps" have sat in the garden all day, and the yellow jackets just fly past them, completely ignoring them :(

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At our former house we had a lot of yellow jackets. Our oldest son was/is deathly allergic to their stings (we had a very close call) so my husband was very vigilant. He would spot where the nest was in the ground, go back at dusk when most of the pests had gone to bed for the night, poured gasoline in the hole and set fire to it. All we had were one or two strays the next morning who had been out gallivanting the night before. (Fortunately, no house fires!).
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limey wrote:

http://www.pestproducts.com/yellowjacket.htm
George
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OK I found a simple way to get those ground bees oe Yellow Jackets. Go out late in the evening and put some Seven Dust in and around the hole. They will be gone by morning. I have tried the gas and all the other stuff that didn't work, then I asccidently tried the Seven dust and it has worked for me everytime.
From Mel & Donnie in Bluebird Valley
http://community.webtv.net/MelKelly/TheKids
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On Tue, 27 Jun 2006 01:20:50 GMT, keith_nuttle wrote:

LOL. It's also illegal and contaminates ground water... not to mention the turf in that spot will die, and the soil will need to be dug out and replaced if you want new seed to grow there.
Jeez man, what were you thinking!? :-P
I do hate Yellowjackets though. They're very aggressive. I've been stung at least 500 times, in the last 20 years, by them.
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Segovia
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"Matthew Reed" <nospam at zootal dot com nospam> wrote in message

How old are you?
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46
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I have never had any luck with any type of yellow jacket trap. A few might inadvertently find their way in, but nowhere near enough to make a bit of difference to the number of yellow jackets abroad in my yard. I also found the bait seemed to attract other unwelcome species, such as bald faced hornets.
According to masterbeekeeper.com, the most effective way to deal with them is by spraying an appropriate pesticide into the nest opening in the evening (when most of them are home). They warn to dress appropriately, secure sleeves and pants legs, establish "an unobstructed escape route," and if light is needed, use one covered with red cellophane so the yellow jackets cannot see it. They also mention that 2-3 treatments will likely be needed; to avoid wearing light colors, perfume, or cologne; and, due to the high risk of being stung, "you may wish to seek professional help."
Jo Ann
Matthew Reed wrote:

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"Matthew Reed" <nospam at zootal dot com nospam> wrote:

No, unless of course you squeeze it. RARE!

They like to eat meat luckily very small meat ;))

In my yellow trap ( Color matters!!)_ I just put sugar water 1:4 . Same as hummers NO COLOR dye stuff YUK . They (Jackets) can get in easy but is difficult to get out and drown.
Now taking out a nest is another matter and I'd do it at night with a simple toxin or water . A hose with water first choice. Pyrethrum my second choice . Search 1600 X-clude.
http://www.google.com/search?q 00%20X-clude
Spray cover with a rock or dirt. I use this in my home. Carefully. Be also aware that Parkinson disease and insecticides are being recognized as being related. Rotenone seemingly innocuous is not the case. So if you spray do it with care and concern for you and yours and even the other critters in your garden world.
Bill
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On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 17:17:58 -0400, William Wagner wrote:

I've got to disagree with you here. If we were talking about honey bees or bumble bees, I'd agree completely. They are very passive and rarely sting. But yellow jacket wasps are an entirely different story, they're aggressive as hell and will sting at the slightest provocation.
On the other hand, I think it's a little silly to fear them. The stings are more surprising than they are painful. Of course, if a person is allergic then he would be wise to keep a *very* healthy distance from them.
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Segovia
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Please always disagree otherwise I'll be confined to my narrow world view and ignorance.
I think Yellow Jackets lose their focus when water is rare and the winter is coming. Otherwise charming to see them clean my plants.
Song Can't have one without the other.
Bill
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Reed" <nospam at zootal dot com nospam> says... :) I'm curious that they are ignoring the trap I put out. It came with some :) "attractant", but I'm thinking they are not interested in that, they want :) food, so maybe I need to put some meat or fruit in the trap? :) :) :)
This time of year they have a meat diet to feed their young. You might try placing a piece of uncooked bologna or tuna fish in the trap and see if it attracts them, though with them foraging around the garden for caterpillars and spiders they shouldn't be a bother to you. Later in the Summer when they change their diet to sugars, the juice and attractants will work for bait.
--
Lar

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