Won't Use Soaker Hoses Again This Season

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"David Hare-Scott" wrote

Thats's his take. It doesn't match mine at all. Sure I do it for fun and so I can know what is really in my foods, but the savings can be really obvious with a small 'garden'.
Take one part only of mine. 12$ for a container bought a decade or more ago. I got 2 bunches of chives (bulb on) and 2 of green onions (bulb on). Used the tops and planted the bulbs with a bit of the green. First year I had to crop carefully as they recovered. Since then, I get enough to even dehydrate enough for the winter use. Since I moved back stateside in Oct 2007 (ITCS USN Ret), I had to restart a container in spring 2008. That needed soil bought as I don't have enough topsoil to just strip some from the yard (about 15$ worth). In 2009 and 2010, I didn't have to buy ANY chives or green onion tops. I only bought a few in 2008 (replanting 1/2 the bulbs). Once a year I add about 2$ worth of fresh soil and a little fertilizer (mixed in a water jug).
I easily this past year cropped 30$ worth store-price chives and green onions with a 2$ or so outlay. Even in 2008, I broke even although if I had had to also get the container, first year would have been a loss.
I don't grow enough to be more than for 'fun' with most things but that's just a choice in how much time I want to spend at it. You may 'scoff' at container gardening, but with 26 years of apartment living, it's often the only option so I got pretty good at it.
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Reminds me of the story about a journalist assigned to the Jerusalem bureau takes an apartment overlooking the historic Wailing Wall. Everyday when she looks out, she sees an old bearded Jewish man praying vigorously. Certain he would be a good interview subject, the journalist goes down to the Wall and introduces herself to the old man. She asks, "You come every day to the Wall, sir, how long have you been doing that and what are you praying for?"
The old man replies, "I have come here to pray every day for 25 years. In the morning I pray for world peace and for the brotherhood of man. I go home, have a cup of tea, and I come back and pray for the eradication of illness and disease from the earth. And very, very important, I pray for peace and understanding between the Israelis and Palestinians."
The journalist is very impressed. "How does it make you feel to come here every day for 25 years and pray for these wonderful things?" she asks.
The old man replies calmly, "Like I'm talking to a wall." -----
David, I'm glad to see you are keeping up the tradition.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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A very good analogy here :)
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Sort of got me thinking that actions speak louder than words perhaps prayers too.
Su Tung-po (1037 - 1101 / China)
Battle of Red Cliff
The Yangtze flows east Washing away A thousand ages of great men West of the ramparts -- People say -- Are the fabled Red Cliffs of young Chou of the Three Kingdoms Rebellious rocks pierce the sky Frightening waves rip the bank The backwash churns vast snowy swells -- River and mountains like a painting how many heroes passed them, once ...
Think back to those years, Chou Yu -- Just married to the younger Chiao -- Brave, brilliant With plumed fan, silk kerchief Laughed and talked While masts and oars vanished to flying ash and smoke! I roam through ancient realms Absurdly moved Turn gray too soon -- A man's life passes like a dream -- Pour out a cup then, to the river, and the moon
.........
Bill who has a 3 WEEK HEAD COLD
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

"Always tell the truth and you don't have to remember anything."
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I'll drink to that ;O)

About 2 months ago, we had a regional cold going around. It would briefly set up in your head, and then go to your chest. After a day or 2 you'd feel better, only to come down with it again. The only consistent thing about it was a dry cough. It lasted about 3 - 4 weeks.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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Snap! That mongrel seems to have spread around the globe.
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Globe trotting, twice around the world before the virus can even incubate. I was told it was in Saint Lucia (West Indies, Caribbean). Where I work, everybody got it. Nasty little bugger. Yeah, it had been years since I had a cold (I think I subbed in a primary school.=:o() Well, if it got half-way around the world one way, it probably got half-way around the other as well.
So, this is the 21st Century.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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Well, I like soaker hoses and I installed a system this year using an old Hoselock water meter I had, so I can regulate how much water I put on the long border of my garden. I've a supply that goes from this dedicated tap below our kitchen window under the patio and up behind my koi pool waterfall to where the soaker hose is connected.
[image:
http://img412.imageshack.us/img412/7012/p1020996o.jpg]
This has two Hoselock three way valves in it so I can water any combination from one to three sections at a time.
[image:
http://img823.imageshack.us/img823/487/p1030009o.jpg]
But my greatest indulgence were the "pop up" sprinklers I installed in my lawn using "speedfit" pipe and connectors, for a total outlay of around fifty quid.
[image:
http://img94.imageshack.us/img94/7913/p1020994q.jpg]
It then rained for about three months!
Needless to say, I'm not on a water meter!
--
Doghouse Riley


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On Thu, 30 Dec 2010 22:52:37 +0000, Doghouse Riley

Excellent! Nice set up. Lovely garden... thanks for the pictures.
I'll add for those who don't know that there are several grades of soaker hose, better quality soaker hose lasts for many years and does not waste water. With soaker hose timers and sufficient volume at the correct pressure are important.
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His ideal sound like the Hornet is a result of inbred Population decline, rather than as the source of the decline. All Inbred animals, if their number will decline too much as a mechanism Survival.
--
reetzblak

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"Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message be given> wrote:

I'm not a market gardener so yes, it could be called 'a hobby'. But then since I'm not motivated by money or saving or selling then to me there's no point in labelling it. It's something I'm very serious aobut and have been for about 35 years. I didnt' even spend that much time as a wage slave and that was supposed to be a 'profession'.
Sure home grown tomatoes taste

No, they don't all 'come in' at once. That is an importatn point of my growing stuff. I use succession planting and I also grow older varieties which tend to crop over a long period rather than do their stuff in a week and then die.
Unless one goes into crops on a large enough scale to

I don't use 'powered equipment'. I use human power. I have never broken a fork or a spade. I think I've broken one of maybe 2 handles in 40 years of gardening and they were easily replaced.
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"FarmI" wrote Brooklyn1 wrote

Same here. With mostly containers in use, I learned to do the tomatoes in several versions. Some early crop, some crop best mid-summer, others are more fall prone (but crop some in summer).
6 -8 plants work for us for tomatoes. I normally do 6 bell peppers as well.
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EVP MAN wrote:

You might approach your municipal authorities and point out that they are charging you for a service you are not using. In our town, they responded by reducing the sewage charge during the irrigation system by a percentage designed to match your sewage charge to what water you use during the non-irrigating system. Seems fair to me.
I agree that drip irrigation systems are more efficient than the indiscriminate soaker hoses, although they take a bit more work to install. You can use different sizes of nozzles depending on the watering need of each plant, and I use extra long feeder lines, in case I decide to move a plant (or one dies and I want to put the replacement in a different spot. I think either will work well with rain barrels, although I have read that some states do not allow rain barrels, arguing that they keep the water from going into the aquifier (I have no idea where they think the water goes after you take it out of the rain barrel and put in on your garden or lawn).
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"Notat Home" wrote

Here, the objection to rain barrels is mosquitos. Although you can prevent them with a thin layer of oil, that too requires some level of tending that many do not do. Hehe I have a friend who uses them and he puts in a few goldfish (feeding them yes). The fish poop doesnt harm the plants any.
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On 12/26/2010 11:01 AM, Notat Home wrote:

If you are considering using collected water from rain barrels or ponds or whatever to feed a drip system be sure that you have a _good_ inline filter in the water feed. It takes almost nothing to clog the drip emitters and once they are plugged up they are a lost cause.
If I were younger and building or remodeling a house it would be great to install an underground cistern for rain collection. In some rather dry climates it is possible to collect enough free water for a large garden from the roof of the house. Of course the huge underground storage tank is far from free but over the span of a couple of decades it will surely pay for itself several times over.
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wrote:

Break even over a couple of decades, that's twenty years, that indicates a lotta bucks invested... not to mention unanticipated costs like pump, wiring, electric, and plumbing, and what happens when it doesn't rain... it would be far less costly to simply buy your produce from the stupidmarket/farmstand. In dry climates water from a cistern would get sucked up into the hot bone dry ground in no time, far faster than you can collect it, a total waste. Unless you have a natural body of water to pump from or your own well then what makes the most sense is to keep your hobby farm small and use tap water. My garden is located right along side a natural spring fed stream, even during the dry spells it can keep the ground fairly damp for like 2-3 weeks. I have my own well too, but were I to use it constantly it would cost a lot to repair it when it broke down. I learned to keep my vegetable garden small, a few years back I gave up more than 1/3 to blueberry bushes... a 50' X 50' plot can produce enough veggies for six families, I got tired of giving them away. Knowing then what I know now I would have built my garden 1/4 its size.
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Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

It is not all about cost. I prefer not to consume genetically engineered, roundup filled soil and pesticide on my produce. If one purchases organic produce, those cost factors may change dramatically. I can have varieties that are not found at your local market. Also for me it is about being independent, which also beyond a cost factor.
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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