Will you be gardening 10 years from now?

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OK, global climate change is a fact. I don't want to get into whether it is caused by humans or not, so I will ignore any replies that argue that.
My gardening question is this: all the best scenarios say weather will become more extreme and more variable. Variable extreme weather is death to the home gardener. Any suggestions on this?
Chris
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For the last 4 decades, as I read it, there have been no global cold records, however there are a number of global record highs. The rain is going to move North, and the greatest temperature change will be at the higher latitudes. Water shortages may begin in 9 years. I don't mean to alarm anyone, but exponential growth is impressive. One becomes 2, becomes 4, which becomes 8, to 16, and so on and so forth, usw. Now, if you had a pond that filled exponentially in 13 days, at how many days would half a pond be?
For example, if just the ice around Greenland melted, it would raise the sea level 6'. Out of 150 original glaciers in Glacier National Park, 29 remain.
Do you know who your Congressional representatives are? What are they doing about Global Warming, over population, and the disappearing water, which without "modern crops" can't be grown. A whole lot of countries including China, India, and the U.S.A. are running out of water quickly, like in California where farmers can make more money selling water than they can farming.
Contact your Congresspersons, and maybe stake your claim to the first Arctic Ocean resort.
--
- Billy

Mad dog Republicans to the right. Democratic spider webs to the left. True
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Not to mention the impending disaster when the aquifers in western North America are pumped dry. They're taking about 6 more inches out than are replenished, annually. If you think the price of bread or flour is high now, wait until that water crunch hits.
Chris

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The Ogalla Aquifer in Nebraska and Kansas seems OK, but it is running dry in Texas and New Mexico. Aquifers in Yemen, India, northern China, Afghanistan, Mexico, and Pakistan are being pumped faster than they can recharge. There is fossil water aquifers in Saudi Arabia, which are close to running dry. One fifth of the American grain, 3/5 Indian grain, and 4/5 of China's grain comes from irrigation. India and China account for 40% of the worlds population. These 3 countries account for 50% of the world's annual grain harvest. Half the world's population live in countries with falling aquifers. Forty percent of the world's grain comes from irrigated land, and 70% of the worlds fresh water is used for irrigation.
Add to this diminished snow falls, as on the Sierras in California that is diverted to farming in the Central Valley, and vanishing glaciers in Bolivia and India, and a scary problem presents itself. IIRC in 1970 there was 130 days of excess food for everyone on the planet. Today there is 40 days of excess food.
A 3 foot rise in the oceans would sharply reduce the amount of rice grown in Bangladesh, and the Mekong Delta. Vietnam exports rice to 20 countries.
When temperatures rise during the growing season, grain yields fall. Crop ecologists use a rule of thumb that for each 1-degree-Celsius rise in temperature above the optimum during the growing season, you can expect a 10% decline in grain yields. Photosynthesis plateaus at 95 degrees Fahrenheit, declines to 104 degrees F, and then stops.
My latest reading material is:
"World on the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse" by Lester Russell Brown <(Amazon.com product link shortened) 339491/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid06790530&sr=1-1> (Available at a library near you [while they are still open])
--
- Billy

Mad dog Republicans to the right. Democratic spider webs to the left. True
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On Mon, 30 May 2011 14:24:26 -0700, Billy wrote:

Snip of rest.
Billy, have you seen the movie, "Home" from the Home Project.
You might like it, if you can stay awake. ( I had to watch it twice, fell asleep the first time.)
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No, I haven't seen it, yet. I just looked at the trailer and the photography is magnificent. Thanks. <
http://www.youtube.com/homeproject#p/a/f/0/jqxENMKaeCU

I presume that most people would rather stick their heads in the sand rather than know what's going on. That may be a reasonable thing to do since there doesn't seem to be much of anything that we can do about the destruction of habitat on our planet that we, and other species, require to survive. It has been calculated that to continue consuming natural resources, sustainably, at our present rate, we would need one and a half Earths. In a reasonable world, pissed-off, irate citizens would be in the streets with pitchfork and torches, insisting on our world back, but Americans aren't Egyptians. By the time we are, it may be too late.
World wide water and food shortages by 2020 - 30 (The federal government says that thirty-six states face water shortages in the next five years.), 12 billion people by 2065, and our 400 Mubaraks salt away billions of dollars against the coming hard times. Billionaires can't be too careful in protecting themselves. They need our money. It is the billionaires who own the corporations that buy the politicians, who need a billion dollars to run for president. ($1,000,000,000)
Taxes Citizen$ ---> Government ---> Corporations ---> Top 1% <--Where our money went
but I digress.
--
- Billy

Mad dog Republicans to the right. Democratic spider webs to the left. True
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Actually, most of the resource issues can be solved easily. One child per family and in a few centuries we'd be back at sustainable levels.
Right now that doesn't seem to be in the cards but there is a small chance we'll learn.
The habitat will come back even if we to wait for plate subduction.
--
Dan Espen

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Another REALLY excellent book: The World Without Us (Paperback) by Alan Weisman <(Amazon.com product link shortened) _1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid74206221&sr=1-1>
--
- Billy

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On 5/29/11 8:44 PM, Chris wrote:

In 10 years, I will be 80. I hope to putter, but I strongly doubt whether I will climb my hill to tend my grape vines. Even today, when I reach the top of the hill, I have to take a few minutes to catch my breath. The hill is more steep than the county's current grading codes allow; I can stand on the top and inspect the roof of my two-story house.
In 10 years, I am unlikely to still be pruning my peach tree or mock orange (Pittosporum tobira) bushes. I don't know if I will be able to drag my 75-foot hose around the yard.
That does NOT mean I am unconcerned about climate change. I am very concerned because I have grandchildren, and I want them to have grandchildren.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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????? Garden as one would do in an area of extremes of course.
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Extreme is one thing. When you toss in "variable" it becomes another whole problem.
Chris
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Extreme is one thing. When you toss in "variable" it becomes another whole problem. ________________________________ Well which particular 'variable' did you have in mind?
People already do garden in extreme and variable conditions right round the world , but until you tell us exactly what sort of extreme and variable you have in your mind's eye, then this subject is too nebulous to discuss.
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More and more companies are growing produce inside green houses where the environment is controlled. Here in Michigan, many stores get their produce from Canada where tomatoes and lettuces are grown year round indoors.
If the Earths environment gets real bad due to global warming, it will not be the end of human life. Nature itself will be destroyed, but humans and selected animals may continue in a controlled indoor environment. Like living on another planet like Mars or Eaarth.
Growing foods indoors on a personal scale is also a growing industry. Since Michigan passed the Medical Weed law, there are now many many hydroponic and gardening stores on every street corner. In those stores are all kinds of grow lights, large pots and fertilizers for growing just about everything. For others not so fortunate to have the money or land, the average person can consume a product called "Soylent Green".
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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How do you see this as being a possibility where nature itself has been destroyed?
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I believe the human race can go on without nature. Food stuff probably can be completely manufactured from basic elements. Quality of life may not be there, but humans could continue. It may be true that I watch to much science fiction also. Way too much... :)
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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wrote in message

LOL. I suspect you might be right about too much SF.
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Seems to me, they garden in Alaska and at the Equator. Aren't those both examples of extreme weather?
Maybe you have some other kind of extreme in mind?
The tornados ripping through the middle of the US affect a very small percentage of the total land surface.
Anyway, what's with the doom and gloom. Here in the northern hemisphere it's spring and phrases like "death to the home gardener" seem so inappropriate.
A robin has built it's nest on top of the box that was installed for FIOS on my house. I'm enjoying peeking out the door watching the robin sit patiently on it's eggs. It's nest is on the FIOS box and right under the electric meter. 2 days ago we had about 15 minutes of the heaviest rain I've seen in a while. The winds must have hit about 45MPH. I was a bit concerned about the robin so I peeked out the door and saw that the house and the electric meter protected the bird nicely. It looked like it was enjoying the weather.
Points are:
1. Adopt a positive attitude. 2. Life (and gardens) will find a way.
--
Dan Espen

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On May 30, 10:08am, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Of course they are. Extreme weather by itself is not a problem.
Extreme weather that has become variable IS a problem.

Nope. Extremes of temperature and rainfall are exactly what I had in mind.

Yup. I didn't mention those.

The only reason you HAVE a robin near your house is because Rachel Carson rang the doom and gloom bell and showed that pesticide use would be, say, "death to the Spring birdwatcher". (My words, not hers.)
Now, I am no Rachel Carson. But people like James Hansen and Carl Safina walk in her shoes (read "Song for a Blue Ocean").

I HAVE a positive attitude. That's why I am trying to do a little part to save the planet for my kid.

Sure they will. My question was, what way?
But if we can at least ameliorate an impending disaster, isn't that better?
Chris

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Ten years? In ten years several posters here will be dead, you imbecile!
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On May 30, 2:50pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Thank you for that cogent, reasoned, detailed, and appropriate response.
Chris
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