Will leaves falling in my mulch be a problem?

We have lots of perennial flowers in our flower bed. (12 different varieties or so- including bushes and roses, 15'x6' aprox garden) My wife was thinking of putting mulch between the flowers so the weeds would not grow (easier maintenance). I was not sure if that would be a good idea for two reasons. 1. when the leave accumulate in the fall time in our flower bed, it will be difficult to get rid of them (hard to get a rake in there). With dirt flower bet, what ever you can't rake out, it will decompose with the rest of the dirt. And if you leave them in with the mulch, seeds will start growing there next year. 2. will perennial flowers be able to poke through the mulch every spring time? I always thought that mulch is more ideal it you have a simple flower bed or around a tree truck. what do yo think? thanks
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Leaves rot down to make an excellent mulch. Leaf mould we call it in UK. Don't worry about the perennials, they'll be back. If You're really worried about the leaves, grab big handfuls where you can and bag them up to rot down and go back on the garden later. They can also be sucked up through a leaf blower/shredder whatever. Some people pile them up and mow the pile. Some people push them en masse under bushes/shrubs and forget about them. Whichever method you choose, they will be good stuff.
Steve
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Leaf litter is an excellent soil amendment.
lbbs wrote:

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Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
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btw: I want to use red wood much.

a
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On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 13:47:38 -0400, lbbs wrote:

Perennials and bulbs will grow right up through mulch no problem. As for the leaves you can *gently* rake most of them out, the remaining will do no harm but will actually do more good. Rotted leaves are a great soil amendment. I mulch up and dig in some in my flower beds every fall. By spring they are just about all rotted and composted.
Most importantly, HAVE FUN out there!
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Really, that can depend on the kind of leaves. The only trees that drop their leaves on my garden beds and borders are the surrounding neighbors' silver maples. These are NOT good to leave on the beds over the winter. They don't break down quickly, they turn into a hard, compacted, slimey mess that interferes with drainage, etc. I remove all the maple leaves from the beds in the autumn, and replace them (where needed) with dry oak leaves that I gather dozens of bags-full from my neighborhood leaf piles (and that I use for composting as well). The maple leaves I haven't cleared away around the garden edges and shrubs are (as I type this) lying in solid, tough layers not even remotely on their way to decomposition. The oak leaf winter mulches are fluffy, permeable, and breaking down nicely.
Best. Tyra nNJ usa z7
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