Why do "dandy lions" get such a bad rap?

It is the time of year I dread. My yard is the only one in the neighborhood with "dandy lions." I tried digging them out, but they came back. I do not want to use chemicals. The flowers are really a nice yellow. Why do people like to avoid them? Is it a plot on the part of chemical companies? Having lived in Arizona for a good part of my life, I like any plant that grows.
Tom
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I like them myself. My horses love them. So do the rabbits. That's seven votes for dandelions here and I leave them be. However, they spread easier than melted butter and neighbors who fight to get them out of their lawn might not be inclined to think they're so cute in your lawn. Fortunately, we don't have that problem here. The biggest crime in Indiana seems to be to not cutting your lawn weekly, not one dotted with dandelions.
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Champion of the dandelion here. Sorry I'm late. Dandelion salad used to be severed around President's Day. Therefore it is blatantly un-American to kill this patriotic plant. After President's Day, it still gives flavor to salads made from the living-dead lettuce purchased in stores. It ezz not just for zee French anymore. It is a mild diuretic for folks with high blood-pressure and, a good source for vitamins C and A, potassium and, calcium. It strengthens the liver and the gall-bladder. In it's spare time, it can also improve barren soil. So stay that malicious blade and give praise to our friend, the dandelion.
- Bill Cloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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In article

I live 8 miles from the Dandelion capitol of the world. Vineland N.J. Largest city in NJ area wise.
Greens Good
Bill
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
http://www.ocutech.com/ High tech Vison aid
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On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 21:08:34 +0000 (UTC) in
thought:

Yeah, but are all those animals eating on your front lawn, or pasture land? There's a hell of a difference.
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Front lawn and pasture. Why? What's the difference?
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On Apr 28, 12:56 pm, FragileWarrior

I have a great appreciation for dandelions, as well. But I must admit that I sell a lot of garden tools like weed pullers and weed twisters that many people use especially to remove these blessed plants. Since I don't have a lawn, I can't claim to have a lot of dandelions on my property.
If we spread weed seeds around, we are either deliberately or negligently doing harm to others. Of course, some weeds are more invasive and harmful than others, like the favored dandelion among the people in this discussion.
Using harsh chemicals on our lawns also pollutes the environment, kills good bugs and things, and threatens the health of children and pets who may stray into a freshly sprayed lawn. So, in this case, we must consider our neighbors either way.
------- At peace with weeds! (especially dandelions)
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I like dandelions myself. The roots can be roasted and ground as a coffee substitue, and the root can also be used to make a magenta dye. The flowers can be used for wine(really wanna do that someday...I'm such a 'alky-frolic' that it takes me 9months to drink 3 20fl oz worth of vodka/fruit juice drink), and as already mentioned, the shoots/green leaves can be used in salads and have health benefits.
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Here's a recipe for tea and then a link to a site with more dandelion recipes:
Dandelion Root Tea
****************
Dandelion tea is rich in minerals and is known as a cleanser of the kidneys and liver, and a very healing herbal remedy that strengthens the entire system. As one of the gentlest and safest diuretics, so it is also a boon during premenstrual syndrome, and is traditionally a good addition to the diet of diabetics. Buy dandelion root at the health food store.
Ingredients 4 cups pure water 6 tablespoons dried dandelion root (1 year old minimum) 6 tablespoons dried dandelion leaf (double amount if fresh) (optional) Simmer the dandelion root in the water, uncovered, for 20 minutes, then strain the liquid over the dandelion leaf. Cover tightly and steep for another 20 minutes; strain the tea again.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://www.learningherbs.com/dandelion_recipes.html
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Rich in nutrients, dandelions are good for the body and environment
By Martha Stewart / Special to The Detroit News
For most of us, days spent picking "puffball" dandelions and blowing on the dry, silky seeds to make a wish are long past. As adults, we're far more likely to view these golden weeds as a problem to be eradicated than as a source of good luck. But the dandelion deserves another look. As many cultures around the world have long known, the dandelion is much more than a weed -- it's an edible plant with uncommon nutritional and medicinal value. The dandelion's name comes from the French term "dent-de-lion," meaning "lion's tooth" -- so named for its dark-green leaves with pointy, toothlike edges. Those bitter-tasting leaves are a staple in French country kitchens. In Russia, the plant is known as "life-elixir," and its leaves are traditionally steamed and served with sour cream and thinly sliced red onion. Italians like the leaves chopped and sauteed with garlic and olive oil. The English boil them and then toss them with vinegar and salt. Almost every part of the dandelion can be consumed, including the blossoms and roots. Only the dried-out puffball of seeds is inedible; that part seems to have been created purely for fun, and of course, for procreation. Health benefits Since ancient times, the plant has been recognized for its medicinal qualities. Tenth-century Arab physicians called it taraxacon, meaning "a remedy for disorders." It has an especially potent effect on the solar plexus: The liver resides in this area of the body, and one of the dandelion's main constituents, choline, is essential to liver function. The stomach and gall bladder can also be strengthened by regular consumption of dandelion. Bitter greens, such as dandelion and chicory, release hydrochloric acid in the stomach, which helps with digestion. They also contain generous amounts of vitamins C and A and calcium. Environmental benefits Despite its reputation as a weed, the dandelion can serve a very valuable function in the wild. The plant prefers to take root in decalcified soil, where it sends its thick brown taproot deep to pull minerals from below, restoring health to overused topsoil. Wherever you see dandelions turning a green meadow gold, the earth is being replenished. Dandelions bloom in spring and fall. For this reason, they are beloved by beekeepers: They can depend on the nectar from these blossoms for making honey well into autumn, long after other flowers have gone. The plants are also useful in fruit orchards, since their leaves emit a gas that makes fruit ripen early and evenly. Harvesting dandelions Dandelion greens can often be found among the colorful medley of greens known as mesclun, sold at farmers' markets, natural-food stores and the specialty-produce sections of most grocery stores. The blossoms and roots, however, are rarely available commercially; you'll probably need to harvest your own. Pick blossoms in a field that you know hasn't been treated with chemicals; dig roots with a garden fork (also in a chemical-free area) on a day when a recent rainfall has softened the ground. Dandelion mixtures There are countless ways to use dandelions -- in cooking and even for making refreshing, homemade skin treatments. Here are just a few ideas: Dandelion salad: Combine 2 parts mesclun greens with 1 part dandelion greens. Add a crumbled hard-boiled egg and some lightly steamed sliced beets. Toss with a favorite salad dressing. Dandelion-blossom pancakes: Combine 1/2 cup whole wheat flour, 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 2 tablespoons sugar. Add 1 large egg, 1 cup milk, and 2 tablespoons melted butter. Add 1 cup dandelion blossoms and mix well. Pour batter in small circles onto hot, oiled griddle. Cook until lightly browned on one side, then flip, and repeat. Serve warm with maple syrup, yogurt or jam. Serves two people. Dandelion-root coffee: Use 1 teaspoon roasted dandelion root per cup, or mix one part roasted roots with one or two parts coffee in a French press. Add a pinch of cinnamon. Let steep for 5 minutes for a full-bodied, healthy brew that will help to stimulate digestion without irritating the nerves. Dandelion vinegar: Fill a 1-quart, wide-mouthed jar with 1 quart loosely packed fresh dandelion leaves. Then fill jar to the top with apple-cider vinegar. Cap, and let sit for six weeks. Strain through a piece of cheesecloth. Store in refrigerator, and add to salad dressings and other preparations as desired. Keeps for up to two years. Dandelion face wash: An infusion of dandelions can do wonders for the skin. Steep 1 cup dandelion blossoms in 1 pint boiled water for an hour. Wash face with water, and lay down with blossoms on eyes for 15 minutes. No need to rinse.
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g'day tom,
good point mate.
and that could go for a lot of what a lot call "weeds"
i find dandelions usefull to bring in pollinators for our vege' gardens, as i do with clovers, lotononus and wyncassia (similar plants as clover and all nitrogen fixers).
all our neighbours spend lots of time spraying drought affected lawns to get rid of them, when the wyncassias and lotenonus make a good hard wearing lawn cover, plus they flower. we are letting them take over our um' er' "lawn" as they are easier to maintain and are very drought hardy.
we like having sow & milk thistles growing around our gardens again they bring in pollinators and are often the preffered host plant for the bad bugs leaving our plants alone, and you need the bad bugs as food for the good bugs if you want to run an ""organic"" garden.
On 27 Apr 2007 13:53:35 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@city-net.com"
snipped With peace and brightest of blessings,
len & bev
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.lensgarden.com.au /
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On 27 Apr 2007 13:53:35 -0700 in
this thought:

Pick the flowers before they go to seed, which around here is like one day. It doesn't get rid of the dandelions, but it helps keep them from spreading all over the neighborhood, and your neighbors will quit cussing you out for being the source of their having to spray their yards every week.
People want to avoid them because they're highly invasive and ruin landscaping, they can consume a lawn, unchecked, in about three years. Ever play on a golf course with a dandelion problem? No, and you never will... grown in a proper place, they're just fine, I even know people who dedicate part of their garden to them for greens and wine. However, my front lawn is not the proper place, as far as I'm concerned.
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Probably the ugly spent flower shoot. The young greens make a dandy salad, prepared like endive. I don't care for the wine. While I wish to avoid using weed killers in my lawn, I have been so disturbed by the spurweed that is taking over that I am compelled to use them now.
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