White colour appears on the pot

This plant grows quite well, but why the white colour appears on the pot? How to remove it?
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Markjump

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Markjump wrote:

It is dissolved salts that have gone through the porous pot and then dried out. This could be from fertiliser or from the soil in the pot or both. You can sit the pot in a tub of water and scrub it with a stiff brush. OTOH you can use non porous pots or just put up with it.
David
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On 9/5/13 5:24 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

This mineral deposit can also be from the water used to irrigate the plant.
I leave it alone until I am ready to reuse the pot (e.g., potting a rooted cutting from the plant that was previously in the pot). Then I take a wire brush to clean away most of the mineral.
Actually, I think light mineral deposits add character to the pot. And in the brick path from the public sidewalk to my front door, I really like seeing bricks with different amounts of minerals.
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Thanks a lot for above two responses.
Yes, it is perhaps the case: the water is very hard and has full of high mineral content....that will be OK if there is no harm for people living with me.
However, why David E. Ross loves bricks with different amounts of minerals? Are you an artist? Can you find anything beautifull from the picture I attached?
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On 9/6/13 7:08 AM, Markjump wrote:

No, I'm not an artist.
The flower pot in the photo looks okay. It appears that the plant is well established and not newly planted. The pot also looks unique, not like a million other pots fresh from the nursery.
When reusing an old pot, I do remove the mineral crusts that form on it. Leaves resting on those crusts are sometimes damaged by the minerals. In my area, the crusts can also be too salty for many plants. But I do leave the stains left behind when the crusts are removed.
If the stains bother you, try wiping them with a rag soaked with vinegar.
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'David E. Ross[_2_ Wrote: > ;990488']On 9/6/13 7:08 AM, Markjump wrote:-

> it.

> vinegar.

> (http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary )
Thanks a lot for your helps, I will try to use vinegar but I need to buy a bottle of vinegar :)
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On Friday, September 6, 2013 7:49:43 PM UTC-7, Markjump wrote:

stuff with a kitchen abrasive pad.
However, if you DO get vinegar, allow me to pass on an unrelated usage: I have a terrible habit of forgetting small tools, like [secaturs - Brit talk ] [pruning shears - US talk] after working in the garden. So they are out in the dew, get rusty; eventuallyI find them.
I fill a tall glass with vinegar and leave the wounded tool (opened) maybe overnight. Easy to clean off next day and oil. And swear to never again..
HB

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Higgs Boson wrote:

If I ever forgot small tools I can kiss them goodbye, just try searching several acres. I carry small tools in a contractor's bucket... I've been using one of these for many years, just grab it from my shed whenever I do gardening chores: http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/product/bucket-boss-56-pocket-tool-organizer-55862.aspx?p_redirect=1&p_keyword=bucketboss&p_origin=SiteSearchResults Another good way to store small tools in a garden is in a rural mailbox.

Removing rust with acid pits the steel, you'd do better removing the rust with fine emery cloth. However they do make stainless steel pruning tools: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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