which hedge to plant?

Hi I would really appreciate some help in deciding what type of hedge to plant as a boundary hedge between us and the neighbours.
The hedge needs to be as dense as possible to give us some privacy from an extremely nosey and troublesome neighbour. We intend to grow the hedge to a height of around 6ft and it must act as a dense screen. Maybe prickly? A Laurel hedge is a main contender at the moment because of its nice big leaves and i assume it will fill out fast.
We are looking to buy online and plant as soon as possible.
Thanks Matt
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matttrim01

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matttrim01 wrote:

It is only a guess unless you give a clue what your climate and soil are like.
David
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I'd think that Hawthorn would be good anywhere in the U.K.. Midland Hawthorn is also good for heart conditions. You may not have one yet, but if you are lucky enough to get old, the Hawthorn may come in handy. <http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Crataegus%20laevigata
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No one can really give you good information without knowing where you are in the world, what the soil is like, amount of sun, amount of care you're willing to put forth, etc.
Were you in the midwestern US, I'd remind you that the Osage Orange was traditionally considered to be "head high and hog tight" as a hedge. http://chestofbooks.com/gardening-horticulture/Journal-13/Osage-Orange-Hedges-3-Continued.html
Kay
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matttrim01;916457 Wrote:

Hi Matt, You dont say where you live ? but with the sort of thing your talking about, I dont suppose it really matters. Laurel would be fine but I'm a little concerned about you keeping it to 6ft without becoming a slave to it ! As your asking, I would be more inclined to plant Eleagnus ebbingii, its almost as vigorous as laurel, very dense but it does have spines and also very scented small white flowers but i think you will find it easier to keep it dense to the ground (something that laurel doesnt always do) If you wanted to be really mean and were prepared to wait a little longer, consider also Pyracantha which is viciously prickly but stunning when either in flower or berry. I think, looking at all options, giving your requirements, i'd go for the Eleagnus ebbingii. lannerman
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matttrim01;916457 Wrote: > Hi

> plant as a boundary hedge between us and the neighbours.

> an extremely nosey and troublesome neighbour. We intend to grow the > hedge to a height of around 6ft and it must act as a dense screen. Maybe > prickly?

> leaves and i assume it will fill out fast. I find our laurel hedge is the easiest to maintain in the garden. Most years a late summer trim is all it needs to maintain it, though after a warm, damp spring it can need an early summer trim too. The new growth remains sappy enough that cheap electric hedge trimmers do the job without the dimensions of the hedge growing. It is certainly thoroughly dense. Will also respond well to being cut back hard if you let it get overgrown. From small plants will probably take you a couple of years to get a 6 foot hedge, and another year for it to fill out properly.
I have an E. ebbingei bush and I find it trouble. Need to cut it at least twice a year and it is sufficiently woody that tougher tools are required. Pleased I only have the one bush, not a whole hedge of it. It grows very fast. In theory it should have fragrant flowers in the winter and berries in the spring, but our has only produced about 3 berries in total.
I think a hawthorn hedge could be hard and painful work to trim. Also will lose much opacity during the winter. If you want a dense thorny evergreen hedge, that isn't too much work, I'd have a look at the various kinds of Berberis. Some of them are very dense, evergreen, easily trimmed, and thorny. You can have an optically opaque hedge that takes up less space than a laurel hedge. Plus it can have attractive flowers and berries.
There are also suitable pyracantha for hedging, which is evergreen, dense and thorny with attractive flowers and spectactular berries, but being rather woody would be harder work to trim. Again, achieves an opaque hedge with slightly less space than laurel.
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echinosum;916554 Wrote: > But I have half a memory of there being something else that looks rather > like that, but I'd have to hunt through my fungus books for it some > other time.
Had a hunt through my books, and didn't find any better ideas.
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"echinosum" wrote in message
echinosum;916554 Wrote:

============= I never saw the post you're responding to (as so often happens to me, probably because of a crappy excuse for a newsreader) - much less whatever text you originally responded to. I thought I saw some twiggy/woody debris in the photo, and color reproduction being what is often is (not to mention having no scale), I just guessed at Chlorosplenium. Its identity is mostly academic anyway...if the soil's too wet it would need to be corrected foremost. Removing the woody stuff from a soil would only ensure any "dead-wood-eaters" won't return.
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echinosum;916555 Wrote:

Thanks very much indeed for your detailed advice. I do like the sound of a Berberis as an alternative. I like the idea of it taking up less space. I wonder how fast it grows in height compared to a Laurel, any ideas?
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matttrim01;916600 Wrote:

soil, and water it regularly, it can grow quite fast once established. Subsequent growth can be slower when benign neglect and ruthless pruning sets in.
This is a useful resource. (I have no experience of them as a supplier, it just looks to be a good compendium of information). 'Hedging Plant Index - Hedging Plants by Latin Name (Buckingham Nurseries Online Catalogue)' (http://tinyurl.com/3pgx8zm ) Most Berberis, it says, grow only 1 foot per year, but it would seem that B stenophylla is more vigorous and would give you about 18" per year. On the other hand, they say that laurel grows only 6"-12" per year, so these must be fairly conservative estimates, at least for initial establishment, because I've watched a near neighbour grow a 6' laurel hedge in 2-3 years.
These people sell a hybrid B ottowensis x Auricoma that they claim grows about 2 foot per year. 'Hedges & Garden Hedging Plants Online - Hedges Direct UK' (http://www.hedgesdirect.co.uk /) Sounds like a triffid.
And if you are really in a hurry, these people will sell you 1m high Berberis plants that they say will give you a 2m hedge with a season. 'RHS Hedging Plants | Bare Root Hedging | Instant Hedge | Hedge Nursery' (http://www.hedgenursery.co.uk /)
With hedges like laurel (or beech, etc) you will get quite fat trunks in the interior of your hedge after a few years, and you need enough width in the hedge to to have branches coming off those. With Berberis, the main stems are much thinner, so the hedge can be thinner. An interesting thing about Berberis, at least my Berberis darwinii, which you discover when you prune it or snip a root, is that the wood and interior of the roots is bright orangey yellow.
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matttrim01;916457 Wrote:

Hi Matt,
Laurel is a good choice but sometimes difficult to prune neatly because of its large leaves.
Considering your requirements I would also consider Holley (Ilex) - A bit more slow to grow but makes a great hedge and really dense once established. Also Pyacantha (Firethorn). If you want prickly this is the way to go (2-3inch thorns!) Also quick growing and provides a nice dense hedge once established.
Hope this helps
Alex
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SheffieldGarden;917071 Wrote:

Thanks Alex for the info, yes i remeber the leaves being just too big for my parents trimmer when i used to cut theirs.
I shall check out the Pyacantha, thanks.
I would pick Holley if it grew quicker, i like it a lot.
cheers!!
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