Where should I plant Mugwort?

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I have a whole tray of Mugwort to plant -- where should I put it? I know it grows tall and that's not a problem, but I sometimes let my horses near my gardens -- is it a problem that they might eat it?
Part shade? All sun? East, West, South or North? Any recommendations? There's nowhere I can plant it that I don't really care if it takes over but what will be the best place for it?
My soil is mostly Indiana clay. Zone 5.
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On Apr 23, 3:10 pm, EvilGoddessFragileWarrior

Mugwort aka Artemisia vulgaris prefers Full Sun. It's not fussy about soil, prefers poor to average, but does need good drainage. So find the least 'wet' clay area. Maybe provide a raised area for better drainage. Moderate water to fairly dry. The only caution I find is "prolonged use of large doses may damage nervous system" I can't see horses liking it, as it is very bitter, but sometimes they do weird things.......... And, yes, the perennial ones do spread rapidly. Emilie
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wrote:

Thanks, Emilie.
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EvilGoddessFragileWarrior

That's quite a handle you have there. Not sure where to grab on to it. Any way, you may find http://www.seedsofknowledge.com/mugwort.html interesting. I know nothing about the authority of the author.
- Bill Cloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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Thanks, Bill. My handle changes from day to day but I'll answer to FW. :)
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On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 22:10:17 +0000 (UTC), EvilGoddessFragileWarrior

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mugwort
It's invasive and toxic. If I had an animal which could even potentially snip a bit and chew, I'd eliminate it from my garden.
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wrote:

And yet it's not listed in HORSE OWNER'S FIELD GUIDE TO TOXIC PLANTS and they seem to have EVERYTHING in there -- even things that are mildly toxic. Hmm.
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On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 13:49:06 +0000 (UTC), EvilGoddessFragileWarrior

It may not be toxic to horses, but I wouldn't put it where animals could eat it as graze. Horses may not bother with it because of its strong aroma, but a pinch of precaution...
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http://www.holistic-online.com/Herbal-Med/_Herbs/h267.htm
Mugwort
Bitter tonic, stimulant, nervine tonic, emmenagogue, laxative, diaphoretic
Mugwort can be used wherever a digestive stimulant is called for. It will aid the digestion through the bitter stimulation of the juices whilst also providing a carminative oil. It has a mildly nervine action in aiding depression and easing tension, which appears to be due to the volatile oil, so it is essential that this is not lost in preparation. Mugwort may also be used as an emmenagogue in the aiding of normal menstrual flow.
Combinations : May be used widely where a bitter action is needed. Dosage:
Infusion: pour a cup of boiling water onto 1-2 teaspoonfuls of the dried herb and leave to infuse for 10-15 minutes in a covered container. This should be drunk three times a day. Mugwort is used as a flavoring in a number of aperitif drinks.
Tincture: take l-4ml of the tincture three times a day. -------
So you pays your money and takes your chances.
- Bill Cloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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EvilGoddessFragileWarrior wrote:

I'm in TN and mine is in partial sun facing south with it's back to honeysuckle. It's come back every year but it hasn't spread.
Another use that others haven't mentioned is to use it as a dream enhancer - I've made dream pillows using it.
Kate
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With all due respect, herbs can be extremely dangerous. I suggest anyone thinking of using herbs for any reason, ingestion, smelling, burning, eating, drinking the tea of, etc. needs to vigilantly research all the implications invloved. Sometimes herbs oils can be volitile and even effect your health systemically through skin. Just be careful.
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With all due respect, some people are very sensitive. The least little artificial compound or odd protein can have catastrophic results for some people but many plants have been used as medicines long before modern pharmaceutical made their appearance. For sure, be careful, check out what you are ingesting and start small, but don't be paranoid. Long before Merck, and Pfizer, mother nature provided our pharmaceutical needs. It doesn't have to come in a bottle to be good for you. - Bill Cloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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So- what do you classify as 'herb' ?
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A herb is any plant which has a useful purpose outside of being ornamental. A plant which either produces essential oils, has medicinal properties, a plant to be used to make teas, infusions, poltice or to cure or help symptoms of ill health.
A zinnia, for example, is not a herb. It is an ornamental annual. That I know of, it has no other useful purpose other than to butterflies and bees.
One of the best reference books is "A Modern Herbal." It used to be in two volumes and is now in one volume full of fascinating information.
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I was just wondering what your definition of 'herb' was - it is actually quite a debate in the herbalist world. Merry - Chartered Herbalist
Jangchub wrote:

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How did my definition fit in with this debate? Was my definition accurate according to a herbalist?

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Jangchub wrote:

Hi- Anyone's definition of a 'herb' is accurate - the trick is to know what it is before you debate with them. Merry
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Okay, so to reiterate my question; did my definition go along with the debate we were having? Actually, I wasn't debating, I was reporting a fact. A fact that says because someone on Usenet says it's so, doesn't mean it's so. Because it is on a website which says it's so, doesn't meant it's so. Use of any herb, whether medicinal or culinary should be researched before hand.
I gave an example of a young man who heard he could trip on datura seeds. And no, he was ignorant to any potential harm it could cause and now he is catatonic for (most likely) the rest of his life at the age of 17. I was told in a very spiteful way he must have known. He didn't know. Many teenagers don't know and this is a very low reported phenomena ongoing in the US. New Jersey, of all places, has a huge outbreak of Datura seed use, Ipomoea seed use and Brugmansia use to get high and halucinate. Gone are the days where orange sunshine didn't kill you.
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Jangchub wrote:

I think the statement "Actually, I wasn't debating, .." says it all. I am not questioning what you were saying. I was just wondering where you were coming from. Merry
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For what purpose?
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