When to pick jalapeno peppers

This year I grew a jalapeno pepper plant for the first time. The peppers are starting to get big but I'm confused as to how one goes about determining when to pick them. My Chili peppers are easy in that they turn red when ready to pick but the jalapenos will just stay green. Does anyone have a system for this?
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snipped-for-privacy@nospambrandylion.com says...

Green jalapenos I pick at a couple of inches long or bigger. They'll turn red if you leave them on long enough, which is when I usually pick them.
        Bill
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I think they are definitely ready--maybe over ready when they scar. They tend to get lots of stem to end scarring/cracks on them. I recall reading that this was a definite sign of maturity.
My jalapeno rarely turn red. I just found one 1/2" long jalapeno--red. Had a problem with minature fruits at the start of the season. The only ones that turned red were at the very end of summer into fall last year. They usually don't last on the plant long enough to turn red. :-) Also if they are red then the seeds should be mature and the chance of the plant shutting down increases.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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My jalapeno peppers are not very hot this year. Our summer weather has been about the same as usual - maybe slightly cooler on the whole. Can't think of any other variable that might have changed. Same soil, same water, same fertilizing schedule, same location. The peppers have the charactaristic shape, color and size for a jalapeno, so I don't think the plant I bought was mislabled at the nursery. Anyone have an idea why peppers might be mild this season? Thx Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Gary) wrote in message

Some morons in the plant science industry have taken it upon themselves to breed jalepeno peppers to be mild. You might want to try Serrano next time as they still have some zip.
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I say that if it isn't hot, then it isn't a real jalapeno!!
snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com (Beecrofter) wrote in message

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Is it true that Jalapeno's can cross breed with belle peppers?
--
Jim Carlock
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I would think that if they did cross-polinate, the results would be seen in the next generation, i.e. in next year's crop that comes from the seeds from this year's peppers. I'm a far cry from a botanist, so don't quote me on this. Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Gary) wrote in message

That's right, and this is well known to pepper growers. Of the five commercial species of Capsicum, all but C. pubescens (Andean "apple chiles") will cross-pollinate, and all of the many varieties of C. annuum and C.chinense will cross-pollinate especially easily.
If you want seed that will come true in the next crop, you need to resort to measures such as bagging.
--
Chris Green

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I bought some D.M. Ferry's Jalapeno M (Hot Flavor) seeds. The package is stating plant them hot and sweet peppers in separate areas to prevent cross polination... I wasn't sure if sweet peppers meant belle peppers or perhaps a sweet variety of jalapeno.
Thanks for the information.
--
Jim Carlock
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But cross-pollination should only affect the children--the seeds are the children--not the fruits and veggies. The seeds are what grow up to be the next generation of plants. This topics always seems confusing because you do read different information all over the place. I can tell you that I have had cayennes, jalapenos, anaheims and bells growing right next to eachother--so that they grow into eachother and each has very different fiery-ness. No cross over in flavors.
This confused me cause corn is talked about very differently. Corn cross pollinates and many sources say this season's corn will be different due to cross polination. However I then realized WE EAT THE SEEDS! Tomatoes, peppers, melons, oranges--we eat the flesh of the seed container of these. We even avoid the seeds on some. Corn, peas, beans--we eat ONLY the seeds. So cross polination affects the part we care about.

DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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So what if they did? It would only matter if you were saving seed to plant next year.
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snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com (Beecrofter) wrote in message

Yes, I agree - so what!
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