When the yard police goof

Page 1 of 2  
I got a citation from the city yard police (for lack of something more benign to call them) for "excessive vegetation." Whatever its actual merits, the blank for "Date of infraction" was filled in with a date of almost a year ago! But in the signature portion, the inspector did sign with a more plausible recent date. I couldn't believe my eyes. I have requested a hearing before the adjudication board. Would it be prudent to have a substantive defense or are these things dismissed if they're technically flawed?
Also in the things-that-don't-add-up department, in the envelope in which the citation arrived, somebody had mistakenly included a multi-page document pertaining to a complicated housing violation by somebody else in a different part of the city!
-- snipped-for-privacy@cpacker.org (Charles Packer) ungoogled: mailboxATSIGNcpacker.org http://cpacker.org/whatnews
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mail,
Such technical flaws in a citation won't affect the merit of the citation. If you raise the issue of the date the date will be corrected. Mow your lawn.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Martel wrote:

It could be something other than the lawn. Shrubs/trees blocking the sidewalk or interfering with traffic.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's true. I walk 4 nights a week. A few neighbors have stuff growing in such a way that it pokes pedestrians in the face. I like wild gardens, but that's just plain stupid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Around here, people seem to move every two or three years. People move in and get an urge to mark their territory by planting something. Often it is a small tree or shrub that they plop down in an inappropriate spot. They move in a couple of years and the cycle repeats. After about 15 years, you get stuff growing over the sidewalks and blocking your vision at the intersection. It's too much work for people to remove or prune overgrown pants, and most people seem to be allergic to the outdoors. They drive down the street, push the garage door transmitter, drive into the garage, close the door, and don't come outside again until it's time for the next work day. They seem oblivious to the fact that their landscape needs some attention. I suspect that most of the younger people who do this are conditioned by their parents catering to their every need that it isn't in their scope of thought to do anything themselves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The way some people "think" about their yards is truly bizarre. My neighbor across the street has done a pretty nice job of landscaping. It's the type of setup you'd expect from a guy who doesn't really like plants THAT much, so it's designed for minimal maintenance. Not sterile, but plants that need little attention. Then, last week, he started applying that hideous, artificially colored red mulch. :-) We got to talking and he asked if I wanted some extra mulch. I commented that I didn't like the red stuff. His response: "I know it's not natural looking, but when people see it, it's obvious that someone's been landscaping".
????? <scratching head> If 5 sheets of paper are stapled together, it's obvious that someone's been stapling, but so what? :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

neighbor
need
Yep. I have one of this type a few doors up the street. The people are compulsively neat, which isn't a bad thing really, but their yard looks like it came out of a box. It is so sterile and uninteresting. To make matters worse, they use that red volcanic rock mulch. I'm waiting for the plastic shrubs.
The people I don't understand are the ones who obviously don't like yard care, but do things to make their life more complex. These people don't like to mow or trim, but will dig a 18 inch bed, seemingly randomly, in the middle of their lawn and plop down something ridiculous. One person put in a perennial geranium in the middle of a sizable corner lot. What's that about? Another woman planted several small trees in very strange locations, all of which are either too close to her house or the sidewalk. Oh well, she'll be gone in a couple of years and it will be someone else's problem. In the meantime I sure it just reinforces her position that mowing on a regular basis is just too damn hard. Sadly, many of these people are single moms with teenagers. For some reason the kids are never required to help. Maybe I grew up in an unusual household, but I was required to do all the routine landscaping chores such as mowing, trimming, and hedge maintenance. Since my uncle was disabled in WWII, I also had to care for his yard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Kanter wrote:

I've never seen red mulch. Where does one get it?
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At the red mulch stores, like Lowes, Home Depot, etc. They found that organically colored hard wood mulch holds their color longer than naturally reddish mulches like cedar and other wood mulches which fade.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stephen Henning wrote:

I guess we are lucky out West here, neither Home Depot or Lowes carry red mulch.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Lowes in Rainier, WA carries Item #85281, Model #00202 which is a 2 cu.ft. bag of "Color Majic Designer Mulch" with "Long Lasting Color"
They also carry Rubber Mulch, Pine Bark Mulch, Cedar Bark Mulch, etc.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stephen Henning wrote:

I have never heard of Rainier Washington. There is a Rayonier Washington but I am many miles fron there.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Travis wrote:

So it doesn't exist because you haven't heard of it?
http://lowes.know-where.com/lowes/cgi/site?site 04&address=&designfault&lang=en&mapid=US
You might also take a closer look at your local Lowes and Home Depot, because they both carry it even though you don't remember seeing it.
I'd never buy the stuff. It might make for a good picture, but in real life it looks silly. And they charge a premium price for it, too.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Warren wrote:

http://lowes.know-where.com/lowes/cgi/site?site 04&address=&designfault&lang=en&mapid=US
Dumb ass Lowes mislabeled their web page. That store is in Seattle on Rainier Ave. S.
I will check HD tomorrow. I'm about 4 blocks from the nearest one.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

it's not that Lowes mislabled their web page, they name their Lowes stores for the streets they are on.........where I used to work was called the "Morristown Lowes" and further up the road, still on 11 E "Greeneville Lowes", A Sevierville Lowes up in Sevierville, then because there's more than one in Knoxville, they're known as "Alcoa Lowes", West Lowes (for West Knoxville) East Towne Lowes (for the one in East Knoxville at the East Towne Mall area) and Clinton Lowes for the one in Clinton which is a town just outside the Knoxville./Knox county area in the Maryville city limits. Soon there will be a "Newport Lowes" because they're building one in Newport, Tennessee which is 14 miles from Dandridge, Tennessee (where I live and about 25 miles from the other stores...........)
Them calling that Lowes the "Rainier Lowes" is their way, that's all. Doesn't make him a dumb ass. And then you make me laugh by then saying that you'll go check Home Deprived tomorrow for red mulch. Yer a trip, son. But the logic of going to a Home Deprived which is 4 blocks from you makes sense. Test the Lowes next for service and get back to us. I'm curious as to the discussion regarding HD and Lowes on Nursery staff...................being a former one who cared and whose former customers used to and still come in asking for me because I knew the answers, the plants names, where they went (the plants) and made customers feel good after they came into the garden center.
maddie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
madgardener wrote:

OK so Lowes has a weird way of naming their stores. I mostly buy from independent nurserys but when I am at a HD or a Loews I always check to see if they might have something I might want. Sometimes they do and sometimes they don't. When I am looking for a specific plant I will have already researched it enough that I don't need to ask questions no matter where I buy it.
I am probably old enough (62) to be your big brother but if you want to call me son it's OK by me.
Thanks.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
well, yer just ten years older than me.........it's just a Southern thing............... that's all maddie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the thought that you're lucky that out Northwest neither Home Depot or Lowes carries red mulch poses one thought when I give you something to think about........the studies at horticultural institutes has come across something of interest. Apparently when you mulch TOMATO'S with red mulch, they produce more fruit, ripen earlier and have more flavor. That's what I read in one of my horticultural magazines. And yes, sometimes I DO believe what I read. (I only read Horticulture, Fine Gardening and for a bit of curiosity, Garden Design and a few other garden magazines that peak my curiosity. I subscribe to the first three, with a gift of Garden Gate coming from a friend, and the occaisonal magazine that catches my eye. Don't know why red mulch has this effect on tomato's, will have to search the results of this to clarify this better. Or at least give you an issue to do your own research. Or maybe Paggers can fill you in on this tidbit or set me straight.
And I never forgot about the name of the "Mexican bamboo" I was trying to identify for you. I've not located the name yet...................... madgardener persistant as always.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
madgardener wrote:

Two entirely different products.
The red mulch that was being talked about was bark mulch artificially died to look more like redwood, and to stay redder longer than real redwood. It's a little darker, richer red than fresh redwood, and looks rather fake, even though it's supposedly intended to look like real, organic bark mulch.
The red mulch used for tomatoes is a bright red, inert, plastic sheet. There's no attempt to make it look natural. It's not an aesthetic product. It's purposes are to reflect red spectrum light back to the foliage, and retain moisture in the soil. It also keeps the soil warm in marginal weather.
I would never suggest to anyone that they put dyed bark mulch around food crops, but I put the red plastic mulch around my tomatoes. They are not interchangeable.
BTW... While I can find that ugly red dyed bark mulch with no problems, I haven't been able to find the red plastic sheets locally in the spring when I'm actually looking, and have resorted to mail ordering it each year.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
and that's where my brain cells failed me. You're right of course about the red sheets reflecting back the light. I hate the dyed mulches. I used to despise the black mulch that Lowes had, when it rained. nasty stuff...............I don't mulch, but relented and purchased 20 broken 3 cu. ft. bags of cypress mulch for $20 and snapped it up, shared it 50-50 with a gardening friend and that was my first time laying it in the paths between my raised beds. Now I'm hooked. (my perennials are too close to benefit from mulching, but if I did, I'd have to lay it during the winter) madgardener

mulch,
It's
even
when
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.