When do Morning Glories flower?

At what age, or size, or temperature conditions, do morning glories start to flower?
I have four or five varieties, in various places around the yard, in various soils. Some are in the ground, some are in pots. Some of them started from seed, some came as starters from the greenhouse.
One of them is seven feet high.
The weather here has been mostly in the 70s and 80, but once got up to 91.
When can I expect them to flower?
Or do you think I'm doing something wrong?
Thank you,
Ted Shoemaker
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They are photosensitive, which means they bloom when the light is correct. In this case, you will see flowers when days start to shorten. My perennial morning glory is blooming now and will bloom till frost, but the annual Ipomoea will not bloom till sometime in August to frost.
Victoria
opined:

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What's a perennial morning glory? Is that something that can live only in warmer climates?
Giselle (I *love* morning glories but they just don't seem happy here in central Indiana)
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Rev "Fragile Warrior" wrote:

Good question. AFAIK all morning glories are perennial in warm climates. Are the ones called "perennial" cold hardy or something? My morning glories have been growing since January and show no sign of stopping.I have heard they can become enormous here in the tropics.
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For the most part you are right. However, most morning glories in warm climates reseed, and are not perennial. The term perennial means that some part of the plant remains alive during the cold season...even in the tropics. In this instance, this plant does not reseed, it comes back from the roots.
Ipomoea acuminata 'Blue Dawn'
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Bourne Identity wrote:

Thanks! I have regular annual reseeding MG's growing right now. AFAICS they wil grow and grow and grow. I wonder when they will die,we dont have a cold season here. We also have what appear to be wild perennial creeping MGs too.
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nina wrote:

Wild creeping MGs might be Field Bindweed. http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/WEEDS/field_bindweed.html
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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Travis wrote:

I am not sure. We had those in Colorado. But I amnot sure if those are also here in Puerto Rico, they seem to be similar to bindweed but _not_.
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opined:

Yep, bindweed is just what I'd be worried about. It has small flowers and is nearly as hard to purge as quackgrass. Not sure, tho, how/what it does in a warmer clime.
Suzy O, Zone 5 in Wisconsin
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opined:

The one I have is Ipomoea acuminata 'Blue Dawn' and it is half-hardy. I am on the cusp of USDA Zone 9a, so it comes back and takes over the whole yard if not watched. This winter I am going to have to go out back and completely rearrange and remove some of the entire garden back there. It is so overgrown and such a mess we have animals living back there in droves. I don't mind, but skunks and raccoons is where I have to draw a line.
V
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says... :) At what age, or size, or temperature conditions, do morning glories :) start to flower? :) :) I have four or five varieties, in various places around the yard, in :) various soils. Some are in the ground, some are in pots. Some of them :) started from seed, some came as starters from the greenhouse. :) :) One of them is seven feet high. :) :) The weather here has been mostly in the 70s and 80, but once got up to 91. :) :) When can I expect them to flower? :) :) Or do you think I'm doing something wrong? :) :) Thank you, :) :) Ted Shoemaker :) :) Always thought the questions would be When do they NOT flower. If by chance you fertilized you may of used some on the high end of nitrogen which will promote growth but not flowering.
--
Lar

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Ted Shoemaker wrote:

I planted some morning glories last May in an area next to a deck with a lattice railing where they could not get very much light until they'd grown about 2 feet and got out of the shadow of the deck. Only five of them survived infancy and those grew extremely slowly so I pretty much had given up on them though I did up up some strings.
Then, suddenly, wham! They exploded into growth in mid July. By mid August our entire deck was coated in flowering vines with several different colored blooms. There was literally not an inch of the lattice not covered with flowers. It was glorious and lasted until hard frost in October.
This year a lot more of my seedlings have survived despite a hard freeze a week after I planted them. I'm not sure we'll have enough room for all of them on the deck railing. I also put them all around the gas cannister and on a trellis on the side of the house where nothing much wants to grow.
FWIW, a whole bunch of what I planted this year did not germinate until last week. I though there weren't going to be even the 5 I had last year but now there are another seven or eight growing. I put some in peat posts 2 weeks ago and grew them on the deck and they already have two real leaves compared to the one in the seedlings I planted in situ.
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Last year (our first year with morning glories) the 15 plants worked on their vines primarily until about mid-August. Then a few flowers and by September it was pretty well covered.
The vines got about 10 ft high (limit of support) and when the frost came I had about 300 lb of vines to cart off to the compost. Make sure they have a strong supporting structure.
Ted Shoemaker wrote:

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I live in the High Mojave Desert and my MG's are not even over a foot tall yet and they've been blooming for 3 weeks now.

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I live in mid-south Mississippi... My morning glories did not start out well, due to too much shade. They took off after they grew up a few inches into the better light, and only started blooming after the first heat wave. I don't know if it is coincidence or if the heat had something to do with it, but those are the circumstances surrounding their blooming....
Tony snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com
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This is a question we get every year on the Hort Line. Morning Glories will ALWAYS bloom unless you planted them really late. But, they are late bloomers, and usually don't start to flower til mid to late August. The good news is that by September you should have a spectacular show every morning. Just one other caveat -- don't fertilize a lot, as every resource says they prefer poor soil.
Good luck!
Suzy O, Zone 5 in Wisconsin
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