What trees to plant ?

Hi, I'm new to this site as well as pretty new to gardening.
Been spending a lot of time in my garden this Summer and I want to plant a tree, or even trees at the bottom of my garden as we're overlooked by the house at the back.
I want to know what's the best tree to plant ? Our garden is North East facing and the soil is clay which obviously retains a lot of moisture and there is some shade there,
Any advice would be greatly appreciated,
Thanks
Ian
--
Hornmeister68


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On Sat, 7 Sep 2013 15:10:57 +0200, Hornmeister68

Your first consideration for determining what tree to plant is how much space you have for it to attain full size (width and height). Also I strongly advise to not plant a free of a mature size that were it to fall can damage structures, yours and your neighbors. Next I suggest you read as much as you can about the various trees that grow in your area.... consider whether you want a tree for shade, screening, specimen, fruit, etc. Actually once you address the previous basics only you can make the choice.... and there is also price, some trees can be quite expensive, and your age, all trees are slow growing, some so slow growing that you won't live long enough to sit in their shade... so you may want to have a professional plant an older tree... planting a seedling or sapling you may well never get to enjoy it. A tree is a very long term investment, think long and hard about what to choose, where to locate it, and don't stint on the cost.
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On Saturday, September 7, 2013 9:10:57 AM UTC-4, Hornmeister68 wrote:

trees is the Tulip tree, but they are the tallest trees found east of the M ississippi river, easily reaching 100 feet in height. So you would want to consider that before planting one. There are lots of midsize and smaller trees, but again, lot size and esthet ic preferences will enter into it.

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On 9/7/2013 9:10 AM, Hornmeister68 wrote:

I have a house. I want to buy a car. What color should I get?
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On 9/7/13 6:10 AM, Hornmeister68 wrote:

You need to tell us about your climate. I know that at least 6 of my trees would not survive if there were snow in the winter.
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David E. Ross
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Thanks for the replies and advice everyone,
The "supposed" tree would be approx 40 foot from my house and about 30 foot from my neighbours, so its not too close to any structures although it would be near the fence that borders our land.
I live in the north west of England (Liverpool) so our climate isn't that hot, we're prone to rain up here and can get cold winters with snow.
Cheers
Ian
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Hornmeister68


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On 9/8/2013 4:36 AM, Hornmeister68 wrote:

Now that you've given dimensions, I would also advise not planting anything that will exceed 30-40 feet when fully mature.
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So what do you want this tree to do? Evergreen? Deciduous? Are you after fruit, flowers, fall color, bark texture in winter, what? Will you care for the tree, as you need to with fruit trees, or just want to plant it and let it grow? How fast should it grow? How expensive to take down a too-big or dead big tree at that location if you choose a species that's not long-lived? How much shade do you want on the ground under the tree?
The only way you'll get far with this quest is to think about what you want from the tree, what resources you will expend for it, and then consult (preferably locally) good nursery folks or landscape architects who will help you choose a tree that meets your needs and wants and is suitable for the soil and sun available.
Poorly chosen trees often turn into expensive menaces. Well chosen trees enhance the value of the property.
Kay
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Thanks Y'all (even Frank lol)
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On 9/15/2013 12:40 PM, Hornmeister68 wrote:

the mistakes I've made with trees but chief mistake was planting a tree too large for the area.
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a small leaf linden tree,very nice!
"Hornmeister68" wrote in message
Hi, I'm new to this site as well as pretty new to gardening.
Been spending a lot of time in my garden this Summer and I want to plant a tree, or even trees at the bottom of my garden as we're overlooked by the house at the back.
I want to know what's the best tree to plant ? Our garden is North East facing and the soil is clay which obviously retains a lot of moisture and there is some shade there,
Any advice would be greatly appreciated,
Thanks
Ian
--
Hornmeister68


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"pacca" wrote:

Very nice tree but don't let that "small leaf" part fool you, it can also grow HUGE! http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/t/tilcor/tilcor1.html
Perhaps a washington hawthorne would be appropriate: http://home.howstuffworks.com/washington-hawthorn-tree.htm This one is mine:
http://i39.tinypic.com/8y6xqr.jpg
If unpruned hawthorn can also be used for screening. Makes a great shade tree, its leaves are dense but small so they just blow away, no raking.
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Things to think about:
How big of a space do you have before it overhangs the garage or neighbor's property? Don't choose something too big, or it becomes a maintenance hazard (or you have to pay a small fortune to take it down and start over).
What's the soil pH? Different species tolerate different soil pHs. Choose something that likes the soil you've got and it will grow well.
Deciduous or evergreen?
How many hours a day does that spot get sun?
What other things do you want it to do for you? Fruit? Nuts? Interesting bark? Spring or summer or fall color?
How much care are you willing to give a tree? They all need consistent care until they're well established, but a fruit tree will always need care if you're going to be happy with the fruit.
If it's a deciduous tree, how much "mess" will you tolerate. Honey locust has very fine, small leaflets that practically disappear when they drop, so you can avoid a lot of raking. Catalpa or Paulownia, with their huge leaves, will kill the lawn in spots if you don't keep the leaves raked. Etc.
Walk around your area and take note of trees you like. Take some photos. If you've got a botanical garden or arboretum, go there and take a notes (their plants are usually identified.) Draw up a site plan and take some photos. Talk to your best local nurseries or good landscape architects about whether any of the species you've been attracted to are good choices for the spot you've got on mind.
Don't rush into this. A well chosen tree will add enjoyment and value to your property. A poorly chosen tree can be anything from a dud to a major expense and lawsuits from the neighbors. Take your time. Consult local experts.
Kay
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