What to do with narrow space

I am trying to determine what to do with a very narrow space between the deck of my pool and a fence. The space is only about 18" deep and 8ft wide. The space is in full sun. and we are in north texas. Any ideas would be appreciated. I can supply a digital photo if required.
tia
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I am trying to determine what to do with a very narrow space between the deck of my pool and a fence. The space is only about 18" deep and 8ft wide. The space is in full sun. and we are in north texas. Any ideas would be appreciated. I can supply a digital photo if required.
tia
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Fred wrote:

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What do you want to accomplish? Is the fence something like a chain-link that you want something to cover it to provide privacy? Is it a solid fence that you want to make less stark looking? Are you just trying to keep weeds from taking over? Or do you have something else in mind? Do you want lots of seasonal color? Or just foliage? Do you want something that'll be there all year? Or something that comes back or leafs-out each year? Is it someplace you can, or want to water frequently, or do you want low maintenance?
Once folks know what it is you want to accomplish, I'm sure that someone will come up with some good ideas on how to accomplish it.
--
Warren H.

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On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 00:21:32 -0600, Fred wrote:

Depending on the soil and moisture, try some ornamental grasses interspersed with perennials. Deschampsia and calamagrostis would look good. Prairie dropseed and little bluestem are good plants, too. If you have the right moisture, some of the carex grasses would work. My favorite is Ice Dance.
Grasses are easy to grow. They have few disease or pest problems. Grasses also look good all season long with little to no maintenance. They change as the season progresses and look great throughout the winter months. Most grasses are left standing until the end of winter when they are trimmed back to 3" or so above soil level.
Two things grasses don't like: being buried deep and overwatering. The crown of a grass plant should be at soil level and no deeper. Overwatering and poor drainage will do a grass in.
If you prep your area right, you could also go for some of the water grasses.
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'Ice Dance' is a wood sedge, Carex morrowii. It would be toast in minutes in full sun Texas with reflected heat from pool decking.
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Thanks for the followup questions. The fence in question is one of the new vinyl fences. It is solid panels and is pure white. My goal is to provide coverage to break up all the stark white around the yard. If some sort of vine gets recommended, would I have to create some type of structure for it to grow on? Pam is correct about the heat...even though this is the dallas fort worth area and not austin or san antonio, we can get day after day of 100+ temps. Watering will be done by hand to this area.

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Run the gauntlet!
Oh, you live in Texas! That explains why you think 8 feet is very narrow. Some city dwellers have been able to plant entire gardens on plots of ground that narrow.
Or do you actually mean the space is 8 feet long and 18 inches wide and you really don't know how deep you can dig?
If it's close to the pool, put in paving blocks.

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