What's killing our rosemary plant?

We've had a rosemary plant in a pot by the window in the kitchen for several years. This fall the leaves started turning brown and after a while the plant was effectively dead.
We bought a replacement a few weeks ago and it's already going through exactly the same process.
We thought a fungus might have gotten the first plant so we used new dirt and a new pot, so the obvious routes of contamination were avoided.
Here's a link to a bad picture of the new plant, but maybe you can make something out:
http://www.visi.com/~bert
Any ideas what's going on?
--
Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN | snipped-for-privacy@visi.com

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Bad Karma

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I am by no means a plant expert, but I have a similar problem with several plants dying/being infested on me now.
From your picture, as bad as it is, I believe I can make out several small white insects which are likely mealybugs.
They are probably killing your plant.
Eric
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Low relative humidity
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Spider Mites.
Hemmaholic, Zone 5a
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Everybody kills rosemary as soon as the heat comes on in the house. Yours looks to me like too much water, not enough humidity. Yhe plant wilts from over watering(kills the roots) so you think it needs more water . And then the furnace kicks on and drys the rest of it out.
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Bert Hyman wrote:

Rosemary is really not a houseplant. In areas where winters are too cold, it can thrive in a greenhouse with climate controls set for plants instead of humans (not merely temperatures but also humidity).
On the other hand, you had a plant that seemed to do well in your kitchen for several years and then failed. Then, its replacement also failed. If nothing else changed during those years, you might have a gas leak.
--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/
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For what it's worth, the plant is happy growing along rocky coasts of the Mediterranean. My suggestion would be to buy another plant take it to central or southern Italy until spring.

I had an EXTREMELY small gas leak a few years ago from my furnace. I could smell it occasionally as I did things in the basement, even though the odor was very slight. The result was endless problems keeping tiny seedlings alive under lights about 15 feet from the furnace. The gas company came over and waved some sort of device around, pinpointed the source (a loose supply pipe), fixed it, and the plants were fine afterward.
Some stoves release just a bit of gas before the flame kicks in. Might be worth looking into.
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