What's ailing my mint?

This "weed" came in with a load of topsoil a few years ago. It smells & tastes like pennyroyal, I just love the stuff. So much that I brought some with me when I moved to another state. I've been keeping it in a half-barrel planter, and every year it seems to get worse. The newer growth doesn't seem so much affected as the first spring shoots, though.
http://webpages.charter.net/slyrp/Plants/M%20arvensis.JPG
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I'd sterilize and replant in a year. NASTY looking but container growing really requires a lot of hands on I'd miss this image in my wild garden. Whew!!!
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
What use one more wake up call?
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On 6/10/10 1:38 PM, Nelly Wensdow wrote:

If it is indeed pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium), it requires constant moisture. It even tolerates wet soil. It needs either full sun or part shade and occasional feeding.
However, pennyroyal has round leaves. Your photos shows long, pointed leaves.
Be careful with pennyroyal, both in your garden and in your mouth. All mints can become very invasive if they escape a container. Pennyroyal can be toxic if you eat significant amounts, but it's safe in small amounts (e.g., as a flavoring).
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Essential oil of pennyroyal once used to abort children. Still useful to drive ants out of a home. Smells sweet then cloys . A little goes a long way.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
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All true. I've grown M. pulegium before, but I think this is arvensis. Actually its leaf form is more like the American pennyroyal, Hedeoma pulegioides. But I wonder if the same compound that's bad is also in this, as well as the American. Here's what the plant normally looks like, maybe someone can confirm/deny my ID:
http://webpages.charter.net/slyrp/Plants/Mentha%20arvensis.JPG
The leaves are I guess at most 25mm long.
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On 6/10/10 5:16 PM, Nelly Wensdow wrote:

It has the square stem and opposing leaves of a mint. However, the flowers seem to be radially symmetric while mints have flowers that are only bilaterally symmetric.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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That's the problem with trying to photograph a 1.5mm flower (with a 10-year-old digital camera). With a 16x loupe I saw that the petal markings are bilaterally symmetrical. A page I found on a similar, if not the same plant:
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=mear4 "The 4-lobed and nearly symmetrical clusters of flowers along the stem distinguish this so-called true mint from many others that have flowers in slender spikes at the stem tips or in upper axils."
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