what is wrong with this tomato plant?

I have some young tomato plants, F1 Shirley variety, and they are about 6 inches in height. I have a photo of what looks like a disease on some of the leaves:
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/simplicool/tomatoleaf.jpg
Any ideas?
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Shirley, you should tell us where you are on the planet.
If you are like most newbie gardeners in a big hurry to plant your garden before your neighbors, you probably planted them out far too early and they got zapped by freezing night temperatures.
Find out when the last frost date is for your area before planting out tender veggies otherwise you are taking a serious gamble they won't get killed off by another unusually cold day.

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They look sun burnt. Did you adequately harden them prior to sticking them out in the sun??

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them
Is hardening really necessary, or is this only necessary if you plan to plant when frost is possible? I know a lot of people that just put the seed in the ground and used good maintenance. They had beautiful crops.
Olushola
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Plants that are grown inside will become sun burned if placed outside. You must break them in by gradually increasing the sun every day. As far as plants grown exclusively outdoors, this is not necessary.
These look sun burnt to me.

seed
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Plants build up a waxy coating called "cutin" when exposed to UV light which acts as a sunscreen. Plants grown indoors have to be hardened off in order to develop some of this cutin or the sun will fry them.
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"> > Is hardening really necessary, or is this only necessary if you plan to

seed
Thanks, now I understand.
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"......... have some young tomato plants, F1 Shirley variety, and they are about 6 inches in height. I have a photo of what looks like a disease on some of the leaves:
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/simplicool/tomatoleaf.jpg ........."
If they had suffered from cold then the leaves would have turned a blue green, Sunburn would cause tip burn if they were short of water at the same time.The clorosis that they are showing could be caused by a mineral deficiency, but at only 6 inches I would doubt that. root problems such as waterlogging can give the same look, but I wonder looking at the marks on the tip and the piece turned back if they could have mildew. Also check on the back of the leaves for red spider and very fine webs that they make.
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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Your plant looks chlorotic and in need of nitrogen and iron. I would find a store which wells fish emulsion and chelated iron and use it to water your plants. Check photo's of early leaf blight and see if it's what your plants look like.
On 15 Apr 2004 09:22:49 -0700, warning_I_will_report_all snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk (John Smith) opined:

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