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I saw a plant growing in a xeriscape area around early September, that had very pretty white trumpet shaped flowers that were about 6" long! They were stunning. The plant also had large irregularly shaped leaves. It was in northwest Denver. I'm not sure if it was a annual or perennial but it sort of seemed like a perennial. It was a maybe 3' tall bush.
Does anyone know what it may have been?
--
Yours In Liberty, Melissa - Colorado, U.S.A.


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Melissa wrote:

Do a search on datura inoxia. It's a perennial that grows easily from seed so acts as an annual in northern areas.
Flowers open at night and only last a day or so, very heavy frangrance. Known as moonflower (plant, not vine).
Janine
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No, these were open in the day and lasted for weeks, and the leaves were more irregularly shaped. Really odd shaped leaves.
--
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Melissa wrote:

Each individual flower only lasts a day or two. They don't really reclose once they open, so are still open during the day. The bush itself blooms forever once it starts.
The buds look like wrapped satin curtains, you can almost watch them unfurl when they start opening.
Janine
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Could be datura. It is a good xeric plant, an annual that readily reseeds. Take a look at this link: http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/4DMG/Flowers/Annuals/datura.htm sed5555
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Sed5555) saideth:

From what I can tell, the flowers on this one I saw were much longer. The white part of the flower itself seemed to be about 7" long. Big long white trumpet shaped flowers.
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Datura?

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IIRC wasn't that what Carlos Casteneda wrote about? Is it the same as Jimson Weed? I don't remember after all these years.
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Melissa wrote:

Jimson Weed is the wild version, it is a smaller plant with smaller flowers. Cultivated daturas are larger and bloom like crazy. Each individual flower only lasts a day or two, but the bush is full of flowers for a long time.
Janine
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Jimson weed is D.stramonium. Can't you take a photo?
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Datura inoxia, Datura wrightii, or Brugmansia. I haven't found them to be "very "xeric" and are very heavy feeders. I keep my brugmansia's in huge tubs and during the growing season I fertilize them twice a week. They need water daily in Texas, so not very xeric for me, here.
Victoria

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Holy Georgia O'Keeffe!!!
You are going to confuse her with so many possibilities!!!
http://www.bgard.sci.kun.nl/48597003.jpg
http://www.bgard.sci.kun.nl/48697005.jpg
opined:

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She painted vagina's, masked as daturas!
V
opined:

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There is a big difference between Datura and Brugmansia. Datura grows wild here in Colorado out on the plains with no supplemental water or fertilization. It is a feature in the xeriscape prairie garden at Denver Botanical Gardens where it also receives no supplemental water or feeding and seems to thrive, even in our drought. sed5555
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On 27 Oct 2003 15:37:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Sed5555) opined:

I've been growing and collecting datura and brugmansia for a decade. D.inoxia, D.wrightii are not xeric, they are also not native. D.stramonium is xeric and native, but it does not have the showy flowers lf .Wrightii and .inoxia.
Brugmansia are native to the Andes.
I think I know.
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-snip-

Are the flowers smaller or just less prolific? [or did I misidentify what I thought was D.stramonium?]
It's been a few years, but I thought the flowers were pretty interesting, if not spectacular.
Is the seed pod peculiar to D.stramonium or just the results of ingesting the seeds?
Jim
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All of the daturas have similar seed pods. Some prickly, some smooth. The D.metel generally has a double flower and a smooth seed pod. D.inoxia, wrightii, stramonium all have thorny pods.
Stramonium is the least showy of them all. D.wrightii has the largest flower and as other datura bloom in cycles. After bloom, I remove all dead flowers and infant seed pods and fertilize. They are heavy feeders in cultivation. They suffer as much from over watering than they suffer underwatering. http://www.nativehabitat.com/ (search for datura in their search feature) has a great array of photos and explanations.
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Here's another photo of a Datura [Stramonium] plant http://www.channel3000.com/news/1700361/detail.html [good images of leaves & seedpod at http://www.ppws.vt.edu/~sforza/weeds/datst.html ]
This one is also called Jimsonweed, or Locoweed. Kids eat the seeds to get high. . . some die. . . many are hospitalized nearly every year in this area. [upstate NY] More stats at http://www.usdoj.gov/ndic/pubs/579/avail.htm
It is a shame because I'd really like to plant some because it is a very striking plant. The leaves look like oversized oak leaves of a deep green; the flowers are huge trumpets of white; and the seed pod is very interesting prickly affair.
The first one I saw was planted in a public garden & disappeared just as the seed pods became ripe.
Jim
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The one I saw had curved irregularly shaped leaves, not jagged.
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Yours In Liberty, Melissa - Colorado, U.S.A.

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Ok, I took my camera today and got a few photos of it.
http://www.dimensional.com/~melissa/photos/Name%20this%20plant%202.JPG
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Yours In Liberty, Melissa - Colorado, U.S.A.
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