What is the difference between an acacia tree and a locust tree?

What is the difference between an acacia tree and a locust tree?
Some websites say they're the same; most say they're different; none that I've found tell me what the difference is.
To be specific, I live in Madison, Wisconsin, and I'm trying to figure out what are the tiny-leaved trees here. If you can answer that question, I'll be satisfied.
Thank you!
Ted Shoemaker
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1. Good question. 2. We have two types of locust trees. a. honey locust - Gleditsia triacanthos b. black locust - Robinia pseudoacacia
honey locust is a diffuse porous tree. black locust is a ring porous tree.
One would have to know the type of locust inwhich to compare.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
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Locust trees are species of Robinia and Gleditsia. Acacia is sometimes applied to Robinia, especially Robinia pseudoacacia, but more commonly (AFAIK) applies to plants of the genus Acacia (and the segregate genera Acaciella, Vachellia, Senegalia and Mariosousa), some of which are also known as wattles or mimosas (not the same as the genus Mimosa).
I hope that this is sufficient information to help you interpret web sites. (I'm not sufficiently familiar with the trees to describe the differences - the only species I regularly see are Robinia pseudoacacia and Acacia dealbata.)
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley

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"Locust trees are species of Robinia and Gleditsia"
They are two completely different trees. The vessels in the Robinia which was named after the first arborist, Robin (sic?), are arranged in a ring porous fashion. E.g., Oak, American Elm.
Gleditsia has vessels diffused such as in maples, birches, beeches and so on.
See wood types here: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/HTMLFILES/woodtypes.html
So, first thing to establish to answer your question, is are you referring to black locust or honey locust as far as comparing them to acacia.
There is a picture of wood in a cross section of honey locust here "Woody Root / Woody Stem" http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/HTMLFILES/trunck%20flares.html
The black locust, robinia is similar with respect to vessels as that of oak. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/HTMLFILES/woodtypes.html
robinia can be found here (note this site the wood may be symplastless compared to samples by SHIGO such as that of honey locust was wood that maintained a symplast.
I have not dissected a acacia. If you could send me a woody stem sample I will prepare it and place it under the microscope and see what wood type it is. That can reveal a lot about the tree and its water requirements.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
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Forgot to add the link here: "robinia can be found here (note this site the wood may be symplastless compared to samples by SHIGO such as that of honey locust was wood that maintained a symplast." http://www.woodanatomy.ch/species.php?code=RBPS
sorry
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.

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wrote:

Acacia is a genus of about 600 species so it isn't just one tree. They vary from small shrubs to medium trees and have many shapes of leaves and habits. So I am not sure what you mean by "acacia tree"
David
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