What can I do with all these Pomegranites ????

This year I have a large crop of Pomegranites on my trees, but I have yet to discover any practical use for them.
Last year I gathered a few of the best looking ones and placed them on a tray along with some other fruit. The other fruit was all consumed and replenished many times during the winter months but the pomegranites just stayed there. In the Spring when they began to go bad I threw the pomegranites out with the garbage.
They did make a good decoration for my coffee-table, but there must be a better use for them.
In past years I did not have the problem because the neighborhood kids would walk by and pick all the fruit before they were even ripe. I had to make modifications to my fencing and now I am considering re-designing my fence once again so the kids can get at the pomegranites.
Does anyone have any suggestions or recipes ??
PON
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Not sure if you are talking about pomegranes, like "granadas" in Spanish or something else. And yes, the name of the Granada city is tied to this fruit. If they are of a good variaty, with very small seed cores, they are nice to eat, but obviously you have to develop a taste for them and learn to deal with the fruit. If they are heavy on the seeds, I do not know if there is anything you can do with them.
Pseud O. Nym wrote:

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Ah yes! Pome-granites, the apples (pomes) of Granada!
Never did like them, myself.
Maybe you can make juice from them?

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Pseud O. Nym wrote:

You can cut them open, and suck on the seedy pulp inside, and then spit out the kernels; I never did like doing that, but a ripe pomegranate does have a very nice unique flavour, which may make the exercise worthwhile for you. You can also press the pulp to remove the kernels and make jelly or syrup, both of which are good on icecream and waffles. Or mix the pulp with water, sugar, and/or other fruitjuices, to make a pleasant drink (which can be iced, or, um, lightened up with dash of vodka.)
You ask about pomegranate recipes. Google on "pomegranate recipes." NB the spelling - google won't know what a "pomegranite" is. :-)
BTW, the pulp is edible before the pomegranates look ripe, which is why the kids relieved you of the bother of dealing with them. :-)
HTH&HF
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Large pomegranates, like Wonderful, make great grenadine and also pomegranate jelly. The dwarf Nana isn't so great. We have both types.
There are various suggestions for juicing. What works best for us is to break the rind, scrape out the seeds and put the seeds in a stainless steel sauce pan (too acidic for aluminum), add sugar, then stir to mix and crush the seed sacs to release the juice. Use about 3/4 cup sugar per cup of seeds - to your taste. Bring the resulting liquid mess to a boil over low heat and simmer for a few minutes. Then strain out the seeds. Once you have the syrup it's pretty easy to make jelly or keep it to add zing and a refreshing flavor to mixed drinks. Unlike the artificial grenadine you find in bottles behind the bar, the real stuff needs to be refrigerated.
Try searching the web - you may find suggestions that will work better for you.
Olin
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At the moment, commercial pomegranate juice is selling for 3.99 a pint in my grocery store, and is being promoted as something very high in special anti-oxidants. Maybe you can find someone to juice them for you, if you don't want to do it yourself, and sell it at a local health food store or something. You could probably sell it for more than commercial varieties, because it will be fresh. I think you would just crush the seeds to get juice out of them.

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Pseud O. Nym wrote:

Well, the simplest thing to do is to just eat them--the seed-filled part inside is all edible. The bead-like red juicy things are called "arls," and the seed inside has lots of fiber. If you don't like the crunch, you can whirl them in a blender and then strain through a big mesh strainer (kind of like straining mashed rasberries when you want a seedless juice).
The seeds are good on salads (spring greens, pomegranate seeds, walnut, bleu cheese, ohmygod, do you think you could mail me one now?!). Or you can use them for topping desserts in a manner similar to berry fruits. More ideas at www.pomegranates.org
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I'm with Dr. Lith, I adore them. I always wind up paying huge amounts for them around Thanksgiving to add to my famous fruit salad bowl. The crunchiness of the seeds doesn't seem to bother anyone when they consume my fruit salad. It has eleven kinds of fruit, marshmallows, pecans, English walnuts, and CoolWhip for a bit of fluff. It usually lasts about three days at the amount I wind up with once all the fruit is cut up. When I discovered Pomegranates and how wonderful they were, they became a part of my fruit salad bowl for our yearly feast. I wish you'd send me a few too....<g> a small box would be awesome....................................... madgardener who loves pomegranates and can't imagine a syrup for waffles and pancakes and crapes.........yummmmmmmmmmm
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rec.food.cooking : is a wonderful newsgroup, where all these great people have wonderful food ideas and great recipes. They'll know. I think there's also a recipe newsgroup.
Jen
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